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Old 12-05-2006, 06:24 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Delrin Back Blocks

What are the advantages and disadvantages of a delrin back block?

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Old 12-05-2006, 09:44 PM   #2 (permalink)
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I guess it would be the bennifit of a light back block, thus equaling a bit faster cycling rate. But Im not sure, so dont quote me on that.
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Old 12-05-2006, 09:51 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Lightening the amount of reciprocating mass on a cocker increases the rate at which it can fire usually, so long as the springs are adjusted to compensate.
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Old 12-05-2006, 10:09 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Yes that's all good but bear in mind that delrin is not as rigid as aluminium. And since the push from the cocking rod is off to one side only you could easily get unwanted flex in the back block that would lead to side loads on the bolt. I'm not saying that it would not work but I'd want to study the numbers along with the bending and other modulus of delrin as well as other plastics and the various fiber filled plastics and compare them to aluminum as well as looking at the loads around the various contact points. For example the cocking rod often only has about 1/4 inch or less of threads engaged in the back block. The loads are all concentrated in that small area so you really need to study and analyse the physics of the whole thing. Or try and test a lot of options with particular attention being paid to wear and any deformation of all the parts involved.

For example staining a part or area with felt pen ink and then cycling through X number of shots for all the options and study how much the ink is wiped away is one way to tell.
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Old 12-05-2006, 10:19 PM   #5 (permalink)
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It is a poor performer over the long run with rapid fatigue and flex in this application . Go with a skeleton or P block for longevity and reliability.
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Old 12-05-2006, 10:30 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Thank you very much for your help.

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