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-   -   Hammer weight versus mainspring strength (http://www.mcarterbrown.com/forums/ask-experts/9324-hammer-weight-versus-mainspring-strength.html)

russc 01-13-2007 07:23 PM

Hammer weight versus mainspring strength
 
Hey - quick question. Will a lightened hammer in say, a Sheridan, bounce if mainspring tension is increased compared to the stock value? Or is the bouncing mostly a factor of the hammer weight, not so much the springs?

Or put another way - will a lightened hammer at a higher mainspring strength be more efficient than a stock hammer at stock strength?

Phantom Power 01-13-2007 07:51 PM

A stronger spring will stop the hammer from rebounding as much, and a lighter hammer will cause the rebound to have less effect on opening the valve. So yes, lighter hammers with stronger springs will produce better efficiency in general.

Al Ray 01-14-2007 02:10 PM

Well, It gets down to valve dwell. At some point your velocity will not increase any more, however your gas consumtion will (this would happen above safe velocity by quite a bit I would think) Idealy (more so for unregulated guns) you want some adjustment so that you can adjust the dwell to keep the valve open longer for cold days and such. You also dont want to stay open any longer than nessisary so you are getting the max efficiency. Now throw in hammer bounce. essentualy you are re opening the valve and you dont need to. Its like that thing (which name esscapes me) with the 5 little steel balls that swing. The motion gets transfered. First from your mianspring/hammer to the valve/valve spring, and then the valve closses and sends the hammer and mainspring back again, which then hit the valve again. A lighter hammer and heavy mainspring should help it so that the valve doesnt re open. However its all a balancing act.

An idea of mine has been to have a light hammer and heavy spring which is shortend so that there is play beween tha hammer and the valve when the mainspring is fully extended. That way energey is less prone to be tranfered through the hammer and back into the main spring upon valve closing. Im actualy bulding this set up in a sheridan based project. Im usign 1/16th inch of play. I dont know if it will work or not but it makes sense to me at least

doicomehereoften 01-14-2007 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Al Ray (Post 82746)
Now throw in hammer bounce. essentualy you are re opening the valve and you dont need to. Its like that thing (which name esscapes me) with the 5 little steel balls that swing. The motion gets transfered. First from your mianspring/hammer to the valve/valve spring, and then the valve closses and sends the hammer and mainspring back again, which then hit the valve again.

I believe you're looking for "perpetual motion" which doesn't really exist, but can sort of be simulated.

Al Ray 01-15-2007 01:03 AM

No not looking for perpetual motion. There is an actual law of physics associated with what I am talking about, and with also is demonstrated by the ball swing device. A true perpetual motion doesnt exist. However were not worried about that, just the energy transfered back through the hammer and into the mainspring by the valve spring.


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