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Old 12-08-2012, 09:06 PM   #11 (permalink)
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I have had rattlesnake, and yes, it tasted like chicken. Liked it though.
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Old 12-09-2012, 02:15 AM   #12 (permalink)
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When I think snake I think muscles. And the best way to cook a tough cut is to stew or braise. I would personally try the Coq au vin method to prepare your cut. I think it would serve it well. Google it if your wife doesn't know the technique.

Let us know what you tried and how it turned out.
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:48 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Python: never fixed it, but from what I have read, I'd start with a mechanical meat tenderizer. Mixed verdicts on poaching, but seems like most call for an hour and can still be tough without mechanical tenderization, no fat so probably need a wet method. I personally would be tempted to try flattening or very thin slicing it, treat like say abolone and then grill or fry. I would think southeast asian or cajun flavors would compliment it. I'd try it.

Kangeroo: only had it once at a restraunt, and it STANK. lean, heavy use muscle again since i think it was tail meat, very red meat from what I remember. Seems like it was well lent to slow cooking if you could stand the smell.
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Old 12-10-2012, 02:20 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Go back to the market and ask the guy you bought it from. They should know.

My guess is since it can be tough and chewy, a long and slow process would be best.

Or go to the swamps of Florida, find a swamp man or women to tell you how to cook it. Bring a Banjo.
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Old 12-11-2012, 07:00 PM   #15 (permalink)
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A constrictor= an animal full of active muscle (it moves and constricts with it's whole body). Active muscle is very tough, but very tasty. Brown the outside and cook it in some liquid on the stovetop or in the oven until fork tender (should take 90 minutes to 3 hours).

For some reason python screams "gumbo" to me.

BTW, a culinary student should be surrounded by people who can tell her how to cook stuff.
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Old 12-11-2012, 07:52 PM   #16 (permalink)
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thats not Florida Pickle.
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Old 12-11-2012, 08:03 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Python taste test review! With pictures!!

First off I would like to say, although I support cannibalism, the python tasted in this meal/review is in no way associated with the employees of Python Paintball or the company itself. That being said, here we go!

As I said, this was purchased from the market district in downtown Pittsburgh. The few articles/blogs spread across the internet have all stated that they purchased the meat at a grocers with exotic food sections. Also, asian themed food seem to suit the python meat well, so that is what we chose for seasoning. Also, the brand of python we purchased seems to be the only brand available and is generally right around $35 a pound. I believe this is farm raised python and is a product of Vietnam.

The meat is pinkish in color and pretty firm in texture. It smells like gamey catfish with a hint of popcorn. Clearly there is little to no fat and is all muscle and connective tissue as expected for such a creature.
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It was sprinkled with ground ginger, paprika, black pepper and a pinch of salt , then covered with buttermilk and set in the fridge for 24 hours to help remove some of the gamey taste and tenderize the meat a little.

After that, it was drained, patted dry with paper towel, placed in a ziplock bag and THOROUGHLY tenderized. Literally for at least 5 straight minutes. Then it was pulled out of the bag and tenderized some more with the spiked end of the tenderizer hammer for another few minutes. Followed by cutting into small strips for fritters and small steaks. Then it was thoroughly tenderized more with the spiked side of the hammer again. Seasoning proceeded the copious tenderizing event. A good amount of ground ginger was used (maybe 1/2 to 3/4 tablespoon), ground black pepper, red pepper flakes, chili powder, some lemon juice and soy sauce. It was tossed together and put in the fridge until it was time to cook, about 2-3 hours.
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When it was dinner time, the meat was pulled out of the fridge. The fritter pieces were tossed in a ziplock bag with 1/2 cup of flour, 1 cup plain panko bread crumbs, chili powder, salt, ginger, garlic powder, and onion powder until fully coated. They were then fried in vegetable oil until cooked to 160*F and brown. They then crisped up under the broiler on low for about 5 minutes. At the same time, the small steaks/fillets were pan fried in some sesame oil and a little soy sauce until cooked to 160*F as well.
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The side dishes were a salad and seasoned rice. Instant white rice was sauteed with minced onion and garlic in sesame oil. Then hot water was poured on the rice and mixed with onion powder, garlic powder, ginger, black pepper and some soy sauce, then covered and left to absorb the water.
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I preferred the fritters, but my wife enjoyed the fillet pieces. They both have the taste of catfish with a hint of chicken, with a very chewy texture. The chewiness seems to be the pattern with python meat. Its easier to eat in smaller bites. The fritters had a more mild flavor, although the fillets were still good. The ginger and soy sauce definitely goes very well with this dish. Cajun, would also be a good way to go. For those who would like to know why we chose 160*F to cook the meat to, it is the acceptable safe cooked temperature for chicken. 160-165* depending on what day of the week it is. It seems to change on a yearly basis. Any questions? Who is next to try python?
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:13 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Who wants to go get dinner?
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:26 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Wow. Python meat looks very unappetizing. Is it because of the packaging?
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:29 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pghp8ntballer View Post
First off I would like to say, although I support cannibalism, the python tasted in this meal/review is in no way associated with the employees of Python Paintball or the company itself. That being said, here we go!

As I said, this was purchased from the market district in downtown Pittsburgh. The few articles/blogs spread across the internet have all stated that they purchased the meat at a grocers with exotic food sections. Also, asian themed food seem to suit the python meat well, so that is what we chose for seasoning. Also, the brand of python we purchased seems to be the only brand available and is generally right around $35 a pound. I believe this is farm raised python and is a product of Vietnam.

The meat is pinkish in color and pretty firm in texture. It smells like gamey catfish with a hint of popcorn. Clearly there is little to no fat and is all muscle and connective tissue as expected for such a creature.
Attachment 36519
Attachment 36520

It was sprinkled with ground ginger, paprika, black pepper and a pinch of salt , then covered with buttermilk and set in the fridge for 24 hours to help remove some of the gamey taste and tenderize the meat a little.

After that, it was drained, patted dry with paper towel, placed in a ziplock bag and THOROUGHLY tenderized. Literally for at least 5 straight minutes. Then it was pulled out of the bag and tenderized some more with the spiked end of the tenderizer hammer for another few minutes. Followed by cutting into small strips for fritters and small steaks. Then it was thoroughly tenderized more with the spiked side of the hammer again. Seasoning proceeded the copious tenderizing event. A good amount of ground ginger was used (maybe 1/2 to 3/4 tablespoon), ground black pepper, red pepper flakes, chili powder, some lemon juice and soy sauce. It was tossed together and put in the fridge until it was time to cook, about 2-3 hours.
Attachment 36523
Attachment 36524

When it was dinner time, the meat was pulled out of the fridge. The fritter pieces were tossed in a ziplock bag with 1/2 cup of flour, 1 cup plain panko bread crumbs, chili powder, salt, ginger, garlic powder, and onion powder until fully coated. They were then fried in vegetable oil until cooked to 160*F and brown. They then crisped up under the broiler on low for about 5 minutes. At the same time, the small steaks/fillets were pan fried in some sesame oil and a little soy sauce until cooked to 160*F as well.
Attachment 36525
Attachment 36526

The side dishes were a salad and seasoned rice. Instant white rice was sauteed with minced onion and garlic in sesame oil. Then hot water was poured on the rice and mixed with onion powder, garlic powder, ginger, black pepper and some soy sauce, then covered and left to absorb the water.
Attachment 36527

I preferred the fritters, but my wife enjoyed the fillet pieces. They both have the taste of catfish with a hint of chicken, with a very chewy texture. The chewiness seems to be the pattern with python meat. Its easier to eat in smaller bites. The fritters had a more mild flavor, although the fillets were still good. The ginger and soy sauce definitely goes very well with this dish. Cajun, would also be a good way to go. For those who would like to know why we chose 160*F to cook the meat to, it is the acceptable safe cooked temperature for chicken. 160-165* depending on what day of the week it is. It seems to change on a yearly basis. Any questions? Who is next to try python?
That is an awful lot of process and cooking. Do you have any idea what the taste and mouth eel of that python is really like if you do all of that to it?
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