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Old 06-26-2012, 10:07 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Good luck being happy with just one camera too.
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Old 06-26-2012, 11:55 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by laxpro69 View Post
My budget for a digital slr camera is maxed out at about $350, maybe a little more if a gun will sell. Do you have a specific camera/lens combo you could recommend for this budget? I will most likely be purchasing this off eBay but have no idea where to even begin.
If you go with Canon, the 30D is a choice for the money. I'd pair it up with a used Canon 50mm 1.8 II lens. This is a versitile combination that fits your budget.

I wouldn't limit yourself to just Ebay. Watch the local Craigslist websites and check out sites like photograph-on-the-net and fredmiranda.
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Old 06-26-2012, 11:59 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by ta2maki View Post
If you don't have much of a budget and already have a camera, maybe you just need to learn to take good photos first instead of getting more expensive equipment.

Some interesting links to check out. Especially the 2nd one. It has some crazy examples of point and shoot photo quality.
How to Make Great Photographs

Your Camera Doesn't Matter
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Originally Posted by Luckless View Post
Be warned, if you thought Paintball was in anyway expensive, photography is even more so. Watch out for glass addiction.

After you get a camera and a lens, you're going to find that the lens either isn't wide enough, long enough, or fast enough, and then you are going to want to buy a few more. You'll possibly start off trying to save money buying "Slow" glass, with focal ratios of f/4 or slower, and eventually you'll wander into somewhere dark, and start wishing for something more along the lines of f/1.8 or 1.4... So you scrap together the cash and buy better glass.

Eventually you'll likely start reading about lighting, and off camera flashes. So you'll go out and buy some strobes, stands, and maybe cheap out going with a wired or optical setup. You'll also find yourself wanting to buy different light modifiers to go with your lighting gear. Sooner or later, if you keep up with it, you'll find yourself getting frustrated with your flash controls, and you'll read up about things like the wireless pocket wizards, which you can be lucky to get for $200 a piece, and you'll probably want a spare as well.

And don't forget the gear bags! Your first will be great at the start. You'll love it, but then you'll find little things about it you don't like. A pocket isn't where you really want it to be, it doesn't hold the lenses in the shape and order you want, so you start looking online, and sooner or later you find you have a closet with half a dozen gear bags fitting all the different types of photography you get into, ranging from one or two lenses for a light walk around setup, to hard sided cases to pack all your lighting gear in for when you go on vacation.

Then one day, years from now, you open your closet and start going through the numbers in your head, and you've spent five, ten, twenty, forty grand in photography supplies...


And then you'll smile to yourself, because you see that you made it this far without the wife killing you by beating your head in with your tripod. (Oh, don't forget you'll likely buy yourself a few tripods. Don't cheap out on them.)


But you have nothing to fear. Just keep the risks in mind before venturing into the hobby. Save up, but the best gear your budget allows, and avoid temptation of getting the cheapest possible. If you buy good glass to use on your cheap starter camera, then it is still good glass if you find yourself upgrading to a better camera later on, or losing interest and selling everything off.
I'm not the OP, but thanks for the links and the great read! As a n00b shooter, I am glad I peeked into this thread!
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Old 06-26-2012, 12:12 PM   #14 (permalink)
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My post was mostly a joke with some seriousness to it. Big thing is, take photography slowly. Think long and hard before you buy new stuff, and try to make a plan out to several years.

What interests you in photography? Read up on it, study it, and work out what tools you need to get, and what are merely handy. Spend your money wisely, and remember you are investing in a hobby. If you buy lots of junk at the outset in a short time period, then you'll have lots of junk in the end. If you buy very little at a time, but make it good quality from the start, then you'll have lots of good quality stuff in the end.

Camera bodies? Easy to upgrade. Your lens collection is likely to carry over, just watch out for EF-S lenses if you're even considering maybe going to a full frame camera in the future. I'm trying to avoid them just because I don't want to risk becoming attached to one, and then feeling bad when I finally get a 5DmkII or mkIII in a few years.
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Old 06-26-2012, 02:11 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Luckless View Post
Be warned, if you thought Paintball was in anyway expensive, photography is even more so. Watch out for glass addiction.

After you get a camera and a lens, you're going to find that the lens either isn't wide enough, long enough, or fast enough, and then you are going to want to buy a few more. You'll possibly start off trying to save money buying "Slow" glass, with focal ratios of f/4 or slower, and eventually you'll wander into somewhere dark, and start wishing for something more along the lines of f/1.8 or 1.4... So you scrap together the cash and buy better glass.

Eventually you'll likely start reading about lighting, and off camera flashes. So you'll go out and buy some strobes, stands, and maybe cheap out going with a wired or optical setup. You'll also find yourself wanting to buy different light modifiers to go with your lighting gear. Sooner or later, if you keep up with it, you'll find yourself getting frustrated with your flash controls, and you'll read up about things like the wireless pocket wizards, which you can be lucky to get for $200 a piece, and you'll probably want a spare as well.

And don't forget the gear bags! Your first will be great at the start. You'll love it, but then you'll find little things about it you don't like. A pocket isn't where you really want it to be, it doesn't hold the lenses in the shape and order you want, so you start looking online, and sooner or later you find you have a closet with half a dozen gear bags fitting all the different types of photography you get into, ranging from one or two lenses for a light walk around setup, to hard sided cases to pack all your lighting gear in for when you go on vacation.

Then one day, years from now, you open your closet and start going through the numbers in your head, and you've spent five, ten, twenty, forty grand in photography supplies...


And then you'll smile to yourself, because you see that you made it this far without the wife killing you by beating your head in with your tripod. (Oh, don't forget you'll likely buy yourself a few tripods. Don't cheap out on them.)


But you have nothing to fear. Just keep the risks in mind before venturing into the hobby. Save up, but the best gear your budget allows, and avoid temptation of getting the cheapest possible. If you buy good glass to use on your cheap starter camera, then it is still good glass if you find yourself upgrading to a better camera later on, or losing interest and selling everything off.
sooo... whats the sig limit nowadays? so much smart in one place!

while my 30D id older, i can still make some GREAT images with it. yeah, the sensor doesnt do too well in low light conditions but for the money, its WELL worth it. back when i bought it like 5 something years ago, i paid 950 for the body and the 28-135mm lens. hell of a deal since the body was still going for 1300 and the lens for nearly 650.

i really dont know what else can be said that hasnt already...
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Old 06-26-2012, 02:17 PM   #16 (permalink)
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wow great read on this thread!

I found Rebel T3's for 350-450 on CL so just keep looking around
but agree look for anything in the Rebel line up and you should be fine
to start out with!

remember Quality only hurts the wallet once!
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Old 06-26-2012, 02:18 PM   #17 (permalink)
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I got my t3 kit at best buy brand new for 500.00.
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Old 06-26-2012, 02:21 PM   #18 (permalink)
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I got my t3 kit at best buy brand new for 500.00.
nice you picked one up eh?
how you liking it?
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Old 06-26-2012, 02:50 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Love it so far, still only used it one or two outings. Gotta learn and play with all the settings. Sold my xti and got the t3 with the 18-55 lens. I wanted the t2.i but they were out and I didn't wanna wait
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:38 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Right now I am leaning towards a canon 20d or 30d, if I can't find one reasonably priced then I will definitely look into similar nikons. My one question for you all camera gurus out there is if I purchase say a Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens, what would I need for that to work on a canon body, an adapter? Same goes with the canon lens on a nikon, again an adapter?

Thanks for all the info so far guys!
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