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Old 02-07-2013, 10:55 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Darkside pump pics?

I'm about to restore 1 of 2 I got a while back. If your interested, I have quite a few pics of them and their internals under my profile

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Originally Posted by Lohman446 View Post
With all the drama, whining, superiority complex, and "you can't play here newbie" attitude I wonder if scenario paintball is attempting to take a lesson from tournament paintball on how to decrease interest.
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I don't particularly have any respect for players using a pump gun.
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Old 02-08-2013, 08:49 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Old 02-09-2013, 08:32 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gascolator View Post
DashHopes has a nelspot that has internals that were polished by Chuck Norris, using only his beard to polish them.
That nelspot never needs lube, shoots 2,000 ball per second, never needs reloaded, doesn't require an air source and when the paintball hits somebody the result is the same as if Chuck Norris round house kicked them.
He nick named the gun Reggie.
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Old 12-28-2015, 06:52 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Not a Darkside

What you have there is not a Darkside MARK II, but a MARK 1 OOZIE.

The company promoting these was Jeu Commando/Commando Game Inc, headquartered in Ottawa, Canada, first on Queen St, then on Argyle Ave. I forked out $250 CDN each (1983 dollars mind you) for 24 of these bad boys and ran them on my sub-franchised field for ten years. Original markers had steel barrel/action sleeves. This changed to the injection molded nylon barrels most of us bought amid rumors of a player losing a few teeth in a hand to hand incident in Quebec... In the late 90's Darkside Inc reproduced them with an external CO2 changer and sold them as the MARK II.

The MARK 1 was indeed a step up from the bolt-action Neslpot being used by NSG franchisees. Later, when NSG came out with the Splatmaster for commercial purchase we snagged up a bunch and ran them too.

The MARK 1 used a Neslon-based valve system with a steel bolt and hammer. The valve system took Nelson or Line SI cup seals and powertubes once the original manufacturer's supply ran out. A machine shop in Carleton Place Ontario produced the internals but made a limited production run of each part.

Loading CO2 was a 2 stage process, undo the big plug which had a screw through it. Put in a new CO2 (not too fast or you could launch the 12 gram out like a rocket if it hit the puncture pin), screw in the big plug, then screw in the smaller screw to push the CO2 against the puncture pin.

To load the paintballs you pulled the front sight forward and a plate-like door opened up. Drop in the paintballs and slide the door shut and away you go. The magazine held 38 paintballs which fed into the chamber by gravity. Pull the pump back, tilt the marker down, when a paintball dropped into the chamber pull the pump forward. The loading door has a quarter sized clear round window just behind the front post sight

Unique to the MARK 1 was the safety trigger. Yep, a second trigger mounted in the pistol grip below the trigger guard. If it wasn't depressed the trigger couldn't move. We left those in for a long time, but players wearing gloves had a hard time engaging the safety trigger and would complain. Gloves we often needed but not for protection, because it was so dang cold most of the time. We regularly played in snow... We later removed the safety triggers completely.

Changing velocity required changing springs, either the mainspring or the valve spring. It didn't matter to us as our field was covered with cedars and most shooting took place a close range. Average velocity once we got a chronograph was between 230 and 260 fps.

Cleaning was a pain in the ***. Once a round broke in the barrel it would ooze out through the pump arm slots and into the body. Running players could break a paintball in the box magazine and paint would drip through the seam into the body halves. To disassemble, you had to first remove the pump arm screws, slide the pump handle off, then remove the three allen screws holding the body halves together. The bolt, mainspring and hammer were inside the barrel/body sleeve. The valve body had a threaded cone surrounding the puncture pin. It threaded into the valve chamber and was externally threaded to receive an aluminum tube, the opposite end of which threaded into a steel collar that fit into the body halves.

Frequently new players would reverse the pump cycle and continuously load paintballs plugging the barrel firmly. Our record was 9 rounds jammed into an 8 inch barrel...

It took a few years for the bodies to start wearing down and the first thing to go was the loading door detents and then the brackets for the CO2 system. The doors would simply slide out and get lost, and when the CO2 brackets started to break we knew we had some trouble. We incorporated the use of a "high-tech restraining device" (big elastic band) and the door stayed put. Thanks to a field staff member who ran a plastics shop we were able to get new aftermarket loading doors and some C-shaped inserts to glue in to keep the CO2 system in place. Eventually the moulded screw mounts on the bodies broke off and we started having to tape the body halve together with electrical tape.

All in all, a good marker for its time. They held up better than our Splatmasters and were easier to maintain.

Sorry for the novel...

Last edited by Third of Five; 12-29-2015 at 07:08 PM.
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Old 12-28-2015, 07:47 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Sorry for the novel...
I enjoyed it. Thanks.

Really cool, useful info. I love reading stories like this.
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Old 12-29-2015, 04:02 PM   #6 (permalink)
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That is crazy, I used to live on Argyle. Can't imagine where they would have been located along there. I learned something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Third of Five View Post
What you have there is not a Darkside MARK II, but a MARK 1 OOZIE.

The company promoting these was Jeu Commando/Commando Game Inc, headquartered in Ottawa, Canada, first on Queen St, then on Argyle Ave. I forked out $250 CDN each (1983 dollars mind you) for 24 of these bad boys and ran them on my sub-franchised field for ten years. Original markers had steel barrel/action sleeves. This changed to the injection molded nylon barrels most of us bought amid rumors of a player losing a few teeth in a hand to hand incident in Quebec... In the late 90's Darkside Inc reproduced them with an external CO2 changer and sold them as the MARK II.

The MARK 1 was indeed a step up from the bolt-action Neslpot being used by NSG franchisees. Later, when NSG came out with the Splatmaster for commercial purchase we snagged up a bunch and ran them too.

The MARK 1 used a Neslon-based valve system with a steel bolt and hammer. The valve system took Nelson or Line SI cup seals and powertubes once the original manufacturer's supply ran out. A machine shop in Carleton Place Ontario produced the internals but made a limited production run of each part.

Loading CO2 was a 2 stage process, undo the big plug which had a screw through it. Put in a new CO2 (not too fast or you could launch the 12 gram out like a rocket if it hit the puncture pin), screw in the big plug, then screw in the smaller screw to push the CO2 against the puncture pin.

To load the paintballs you pulled the front sight forward and a plate-like door opened up. Drop in the paintballs and slide the door shut and away you go. The magazine held 38 paintballs which fed into the chamber by gravity. Pull the pump back, tilt the marker down, when a paintball dropped into the chamber pull the pump forward. The loading door has a quarter sized clear round window just behind the front post sight

Unique to the MARK 1 was the safety trigger. Yep, a second trigger mounted in the pistol grip below the trigger guard. If it wasn't depressed the trigger couldn't move. We left those in for a long time, but players wearing gloves had a hard time engaging the safety trigger and would complain. Gloves we often need but not for protection, because it was so dang cold most of the time. We regularly played in snow... We later removed the safety triggers completely.

Changing velocity required changing springs, either the mainspring or the valve spring. It didn't matter to us as our field was covered with cedars and most shooting took place a close range. Average velocity once we got a chronograph was between 230 and 260 fps.

Cleaning was a pain in the ***. Once a round broke in the barrel it would ooze out through the pump arm slots and into the body. Running players could break a paintball in the box magazine and paint would drip through the seam into the body halves. To disassemble, you had to first remove the pump arm screws, slide the pump handle off, then remove the three allen screws holding the body halves together. The bolt, mainspring and hammer were inside the barrel/body sleeve. The valve body had a threaded cone surrounding the puncture pin. It threaded into the valve chamber and was externally threaded to receive an aluminum tube, the opposite end of which threaded into a steel collar that fit into the body halves.

Frequently new players would reverse the pump cycle and continuously load paintballs plugging the barrel firmly. Our record was 9 rounds jammed into an 8 inch barrel...

It took a few years for the bodies to start wearing down and the first thing to go was the loading door detents and then the brackets for the CO2 system. The doors would simply slide out and get lost, and when the CO2 brackets started to break we knew we had some trouble. We incorporated the use of a "high-tech restraining device" (big elastic band) and the door stayed put. Thanks to a field staff member who ran a plastics shop we were able to get new aftermarket loading doors and some C-shaped inserts to glue in to keep the CO2 system in place. Eventually the moulded screw mounts on the bodies broke off and we started having to tape the body halve together with electrical tape.

All in all, a good marker for its time. They held up better to able than our Splatmasters and were easier to maintain.

Sorry for the novel...
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Old 12-29-2015, 04:24 PM   #7 (permalink)
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They were in a white office building on the north side (219 Argyle?). They had a room next to the police services store. Jeu Commando operated their home field near a ski resort on the Quebec side. They sold franchises for Commando Game East and Commando Game West, using Bank street as their demarcation line. Having been turned down by the owner of the rights to NSG franchises in Canada because I "would be too close to his market" (he was in Perth) I was very interested when I saw a picture of the MARK 1 in the Ottawa Journal. Dozens of long distance calls tracked the photo to a field in Calgary and the operators kindly gave me the name and address of the company distributing the MARK 1s. I put on a suit and walked from my cheezy apartment at Bronson and Somerset to their office at 400 Queen St and knocked on the door. They wanted $250 per unit and when I asked about liability insurance told me that if I found some to let them know. Due to their franchise setup, I had to sub-franchise through Commando Game West as the land we operated on at Ried's Mills was west of Bank St. Within a year the Jeu Commando guys were over on Arglye and were trying to flog the Model 85 on us even though it hadn't cleared testing by NRC for non-firearm status. That's a story for another day though...
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