mcarterbrown.com

mcarterbrown.com (http://www.mcarterbrown.com/forums/)
-   WGP (http://www.mcarterbrown.com/forums/wgp/)
-   -   How to Time a 1990 Autococker? (http://www.mcarterbrown.com/forums/wgp/11255-how-time-1990-autococker.html)

AK-Jake 02-19-2007 12:02 AM

How to Time a 1990 Autococker?
 
Grrr...I've forgotten how to time my old Cockers! I don't remember what year WGP drilled the timing hole in the top of the receiver, but I have at least 3 Cockers and 2 Mini-Cockers that need to be timed and I don't remember how to time them! Anyone remember and be willing to share the info?

Thanks.

Wycke 02-19-2007 12:13 PM

I'd imagine the procedure is pretty much the same. I mean, they function the same way as current or more recent Autocockers. It's just more of a pain because you need to take off the grip frame to adjust the sear lug and depending on how old it is, you may not have a threaded timing rod. You could, however, have the sear lug adjustment hole drilled and get a threaded timing rod for them. I believe that PPS will do both if you send it in for a performance tune. The hole for the sear lug on the old hammers didn't go all the way through, but you could always get a newer stock hammer. Even the ones for nelson springs will work fine since the cocking rod is there to keep that little Sheridan spring pretty much on center.

-Chad

grande 02-19-2007 07:01 PM

Removing the gripframe is a b****, but what roughly works is turn the lug in so your finger slightly touches the top of it. Cock the marker and make sure your firing point is in the middle of the pull, its actually easy from there on, but if you fail to set the lug you will run into issues like having blowback even if the 3-way is set perfectly. If the timing is off, loosen the rear screw holding the 3-way rod, with allen key in the screw and your other hand on the 3-way rod holding it in place you can make even slightest changes to it. I do suggest buying a threaded rod & coupler to make things easier.

wanderlustre 02-25-2007 08:51 AM

I was tinkering with my '96 cocker that also doesn't have a timing hole and found a new trick to time it without removing the grip frame everytime...

Take the grip plates off the grip frame then the spring that pushes the sear up. After that, slide out the sear pin and shake the cocker nose-down until the sear falls forward. You should be able to see and adjust the hammer lug after that. Put the sear back in place plus spring and there you go. MUCH more painless than taking off the grip frame and more precise than fingering it.

Hope this helps,
Kenny

Walking_Target 02-25-2007 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wanderlustre (Post 106002)
MUCH more painless than taking off the grip frame and more precise than fingering it.


Should I?..... no..... must.....resist....dirty.....joke.....

sdawg 02-25-2007 11:01 AM

I'm glad that someone started this thread. I am having a HECK of a time getting my 1992 cocker to work. the main problem I am having is that it won't recock.

Is it possible to set the timing rod too long? When the trigger is pulled all the way back, the three way should still be causing the back block to be pushed back, right?

wanderlustre 02-25-2007 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walking_Target (Post 106010)
Should I?..... no..... must.....resist....dirty.....joke.....

Hahah, I knew I was setting myself up...

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdawg (Post 106056)
I'm glad that someone started this thread. I am having a HECK of a time getting my 1992 cocker to work. the main problem I am having is that it won't recock.

Is it possible to set the timing rod too long? When the trigger is pulled all the way back, the three way should still be causing the back block to be pushed back, right?

The answer to your questions is yes and yes. It's very possible to set your timing rod too long. Usually I have my cockers timed pretty tight so the three way activates almost the same time as firing. Just enough space between firing and cycling so there's little/no blowback (almost seems like there's suction when I'm dry firing it). I'm hoping you have threaded timing rods and cocking rods. If you seriously plan on playing with your cocker then I highly recommend you replace the non-threaded bits.
I believe the timing order is:

Set-up the back block so that there's just an tiny bit of space (paper-thin, just a bit of daylight) between the back block and body.

Next, set the cocking rod length so when the back block is all the way back the bolt clears the breech by just a bit.

After that adjust your sear lug to about mid point in your trigger pull.

Then your 3-way. You can gas it up at this point and pull the trigger as you adjust the collar to get it just right.

If you need more info here's Ravi Chopra's excellent Infosheet on cockers:
http://web.archive.org/web/200306040...t/ACTroub.html

Hope this helps
kenny

sdawg 02-25-2007 08:00 PM

By Velcor, I think I've got it.

I locktited the screw on the left side of the three-way collar... I know this is ill-advised, but it kept slipping off.

Then, I figured out that I wasn't cranking up the Rock LPR pressure enough. I also made sure that the hammer lug was pretty far down so that it fires right before the three-way activates the ram.

So, I finally get a shot and re-cock with every full pull of the trigger, no missed shots.

Tomorrow, I will try to chrono this durn thing, if I don't run out of paint and/or air first.

The challenge I am facing is that the palmer's stabilizer that I have just came back from the shop. That's normally good, but it had a note saying that it is high-pressure... originally, I had this stabilizer on my pro/carbine, but I don't need it there after my switch to a HPA tank that has consistent output at approx. 750PSI.

Sooo... I have no idea where the inline adjusting screw needs to be in order to get 280FPS. Even if the stabilizer has HP internals, I am going to get between 0-750PSI, right? I needs to get about 400-500 PSI to get good velocities.

In retrospect, timing the cocker doesn't seem that hard. Getting field-usable velocities is going to be the trickiest part.

wanderlustre 02-25-2007 08:58 PM

Glad you got that thing running. I've totally made the same mistake of not cranking the pressure on a rock before since I always crank it all the way out when I'm done playing.

Good luck at the chrono!

Wycke 02-25-2007 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdawg (Post 106270)
The challenge I am facing is that the palmer's stabilizer that I have just came back from the shop. That's normally good, but it had a note saying that it is high-pressure... originally, I had this stabilizer on my pro/carbine, but I don't need it there after my switch to a HPA tank that has consistent output at approx. 750PSI.

With the adjuster screw flush with the bottom of the reg, it should be putting out approximately 500 PSI. Each full turn of the screw generates about 100 PSI difference (clockwise increases, counter-clockwise decreases). 500 PSI is as good a starting place as any, but if the internals are all stock, you'll likely have to go up to get decent velocities and efficiency.

-Chad


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:21 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO
© MCB Network LLC