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    No new machines but I am working on converting my mill to cnc. A more involved process than I imagined in my head but slowly getting there.
    Gas, Grass or Brass, no one rides for free...

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      No new stuff here either (unless a portable bandsaw with a few mods count?) but I'm getting better with the whole M- & G- code on my lathe (all by hand)
      also looking at a CO2 laser or a small desktop router I can mill aluminum with ...
      (I have extremely limited space available)

      Love my brass ... Love my SSR ... Hard choices ...

      looking for red/black or blue/silver phantom.
      XEMON's phantom double sided feed


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        So, any advice for buying used milling machines?
        -Yes, tons. But it'd take a week to type it all out here- there's YouTube videos and other resources already out there that can explain things in greater detail.

        But, just to get started: That Bridgeport wouldn't make a bad choice at all. It's probably a little worn, but that's not as big an issue as you might think. More of a drawback is that it's an older M-head, probably pre-WW2. Which in itself isn't terrible, but it has a Morse Taper #2 spindle. You can still do good work with that, but it's limited to 1/2" tools and smaller.

        The seller has an ER collet adapter, which brings that back up to 3/4", but adds a lot of overhang and reduces rigidity.

        Unless that's one of your only choices, I'd hold out for something with an R8 spindle.

        No new machines but I am working on converting my mill to cnc. A more involved process than I imagined in my head but slowly getting there.
        -You got a write-up of that anywhere? (Anywhere that isn't Facebook, that is. ) What control are you using?

        or a small desktop router I can mill aluminum with ...
        -That's a tricky bit. There's very few desktop routers I've seen that can do aluminum well. There's plenty that can do it, sure, but you have to take tiny cuts and get lots of chatter. What's your expected work envelope? Carbide 3D's 'Nomad' supposedly does aluminum reasonably well. Ain't cheap, though.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine & Airsmith Services: Creating the Strange and Wonderful since 1998!
        The Whiteboard: Daily, occasionally paintball-related webcomic mayhem!
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          Originally posted by DocsMachine View Post

          -You got a write-up of that anywhere? (Anywhere that isn't Facebook, that is. ) What control are you using?


          Doc.
          No I haven't done a write up, I probably should. I'm using linuxcnc as the controller with parallel breakout and stepper drivers.
          Gas, Grass or Brass, no one rides for free...

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            Finally joining the club - I didn't even have a drill press to my name. Made my first part (then promptly started looking for tooling that isn't more than the lathe itself) so I'm planning to enjoy this for a long time.
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            • Axel

              Axel

              commented
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              Banjo bolt! Nice

            • flyweightnate

              flyweightnate

              commented
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              Yep, just need some HSS so I can grind the proper profile for an o-ring gland. Oh... and I guess that means I need a grinder!

            Yep, just need some HSS so I can grind the proper profile for an o-ring gland. Oh... and I guess that means I need a grinder!
            -Are you using those brazed carbide tools now? If so, that's actually amazing work for those things, those brazed bits are really best suited for things like cutting off ratty mill scale and rust on big, heavy lathes.

            Pick up some 3/8" square HSS stock and a cheap bench grinder, and start learning how to grind a proper cutting edge. (Assuming you haven't already. ) Also, if you haven't already, find a copy of Southbend's How To Run A Lathe, which has a lot of excellent information on things like tool tip grinding, tool height setting, machine maintenance, and other stuff.

            Another suggestion, floating along with the post in the other thread- for your prototype banjo bolt, hit eBay or something, and snag some 5/16" or so hex-shape 12L14 steel. As I said in the other post, it's "free machining" steel, and you should be able to get better finishes and more accurate dimensions. That hardware store bolt you used is Velveeta-grade steel; if it's regular steel, it's going to be gummy and hard to get a good finish on, and if it's stainless, it's going to cut like cold "Juicy Fruit". As me how I know.

            Doc.
            Doc's Machine & Airsmith Services: Creating the Strange and Wonderful since 1998!
            The Whiteboard: Daily, occasionally paintball-related webcomic mayhem!
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              Originally posted by DocsMachine View Post

              -Are you using those brazed carbide tools now? If so, that's actually amazing work for those things, those brazed bits are really best suited for things like cutting off ratty mill scale and rust on big, heavy lathes.

              Pick up some 3/8" square HSS stock and a cheap bench grinder, and start learning how to grind a proper cutting edge. (Assuming you haven't already. ) Also, if you haven't already, find a copy of Southbend's How To Run A Lathe, which has a lot of excellent information on things like tool tip grinding, tool height setting, machine maintenance, and other stuff.

              Another suggestion, floating along with the post in the other thread- for your prototype banjo bolt, hit eBay or something, and snag some 5/16" or so hex-shape 12L14 steel. As I said in the other post, it's "free machining" steel, and you should be able to get better finishes and more accurate dimensions. That hardware store bolt you used is Velveeta-grade steel; if it's regular steel, it's going to be gummy and hard to get a good finish on, and if it's stainless, it's going to cut like cold "Juicy Fruit". As me how I know.

              Doc.
              No, no such foolishness as those brazed tools. Some equally cheap carbide 60-degree insert tools in half-inch holders, though, and not a cutoff or grooving tool in the bunch. Rather hard to work on something that small with a tool that big. Chamfers got "smushy" pretty quick, too, which backs up your Velveeta theory.

              What I've heard from the machinists at my old job: 12L14, 41L40, and if austenitic is really needed, 303, are my friends, as well as the normal brasses and aluminums. The bolt was leftover from a storage rack, and yep, it was a mess. But it worked, and I didn't break anything, so I'm feeling pretty good about it all! I think those absurd 60-degree o-ring glands are even going to seal based on my test fit with some o-rings today.

              I definitely need to get that South Bend book. I got my tooling up to height by making a test cut and measuring the resulting diameter. I have a bunch of half inch HSS in the box, but it's been a decade since I even looked at how to grind a tool. And I don't even know where to start with maintenance and truing things up (except the Grizzly manual had good suggestions for truing up the tailstock laterally via centers and checking taper). Actually, this brings up a good question. What's the best way to cut a center for the head on a lathe like this - set the compound to 60 and just keep it long enough that the toolholder clears the chuck?
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                I'm kinda 50/50 on what quality of tooling to buy when you're a beginner.

                I've only had my mill and lathe for 3 years now, and when I first started out, I bought the cheapest tools I could find. Brazed carbide for the lathe. Cheap HSS end mills from Asia for the mill. And yeah, they didn't do so great. But I also made lots of dumb mistakes while I was learning, and I broke/dulled quite a few tools. I think I ended up buying three sets of brazed carbide tools before I started making my own tools from HSS blanks. But fortunately, those tools were cheap, and buying a replacement set didn't break my budget .

                Now that I'm more experienced, I've started investing in better quality tooling, and of course I see the difference. But if I had started with high quality stuff right from the get-go, I don't think I really would have known what "good" machining looks like because I wouldn't have the comparison. Also, while I suppose it's possible that I wouldn't have broken so many tools if those tools cut better, I still would have broken some of those tools. And while I have no problem replacing a $20 set of end mills, I would feel a whole lot worse about replacing the $200 set that I have now.

                I guess I'm saying that even if you have the money, maybe it's not a good idea to buy a nice, new Lexus as your very first car. You should probably start off with something used and cheaper to fix. Then when you're confident enough, upgrade to the nicer things.





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                • flyweightnate

                  flyweightnate

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                  Yeah, I absolutely get that. I buy nice drills and taps because I know how to do those ops reliably; my end mills are junk and I know it, at the moment. When it comes time to buy a box of inserts is going to be a tough decision.

                Got this old lady ... Now I need to find a spot and bring her home ... 😅
                Click image for larger version

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                Love my brass ... Love my SSR ... Hard choices ...

                looking for red/black or blue/silver phantom.
                XEMON's phantom double sided feed


                Keep your ATS going: Project rATS 2.0
                My Feedback

                Comment


                • KMDPB

                  KMDPB

                  commented
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                  thats some nice Iron! Any tooling with it?

                • XEMON

                  XEMON

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                  The guy had no ideas what he had and someone picked it up for me ... Haven't gone through it all yet ... but there is 3 & 4 jaw chuck, a few dogs ... There is an entire storage box (the one underneath) full of stuff ...
                  It's at my in laws right now (till I find a spot at home 😅)

                  I also have about 200lb of tooling I saved from the scrap at an old job (half of it new, the rest barely used) , it's been sitting in storage for the last 8-10 years ...
                  So with all that and what I have at home for my Emco compact 5 I should be set for a while ...

                • XEMON

                  XEMON

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                  I'm thinking of making a table that goes over the shop Smith ... If you can't go out, go up ...

                Originally posted by XEMON View Post
                Got this old lady ... Now I need to find a spot and bring her home ... 😅
                Click image for larger version

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                Well got some time to go through the 2 boxes of goodies that came with the lathe ... And it came with just about everything from the 1936 South Bend catalog! So i should be set for a while ...
                The only things mission are a 0-1 micrometer (got the 1-2 & 2-3 street)(already got a 0-1 to finish the set) and a center for the head stock if i decide to turn in between centers. The tailstock is mt2 but the head is mt3 or 4 ...

                It also came with all the grease and grime that accumulated on it for the last 80+ years 😅
                So step 1 is gonna be pressure washer and oiling .. .


                I think all I'm gonna do to it is a quick change tool post and maybe dro & tacho?
                Any recommendations on quick change size for this lathe? Looking at OXA or AXA ...

                ​​​​​​Anyone added drop to an older lathe? Any regrets?


                PS: after much searching i identified it as a South Bend 415 only made in 1936. It's the model between the classic 405 and the famous "South Bend 9" serie.

                ​​​​​​
                Love my brass ... Love my SSR ... Hard choices ...

                looking for red/black or blue/silver phantom.
                XEMON's phantom double sided feed


                Keep your ATS going: Project rATS 2.0
                My Feedback

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                  Don't pressure wash it unless you're doing a full disassembly. The washer can force water into nooks and crannies where it'll start to rust.

                  Unless you're doing a paintjob-level restoration, just giving it a wipedown with WD-40 and some paper towels is about all you need. Personally, I love rebuilding and repainting the things, but more often, I'd rather be using it.

                  Doc.
                  Doc's Machine & Airsmith Services: Creating the Strange and Wonderful since 1998!
                  The Whiteboard: Daily, occasionally paintball-related webcomic mayhem!
                  Paintball in the Movies!

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                  • XEMON

                    XEMON

                    commented
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                    Thanks for the input, no pressure washing!
                    I'll clean it with WD-40 and see what I've got.
                    I'd like to do a "light restore" on it so I can use it sooner rather than later ... Time is scares and the paint is actually in decent shape so I probably won't go too deep into it (yet) (and I've got a jet 6x32 belt sander and a 1954 shop Smith needing a rebuild ...)

                    Do you have any advice for felt lined "bearing"?

                  My former boss and really good friend had a stroke recently and now can barely use his left arm.
                  I've been helping him at his machine shop every week with the heavy lifting.
                  This week was unloading & moving a tool rack and reloading it once we set it up.
                  Lots of CAT5 tooling, figure you guys would enjoy seeing it...

                  For those unaware of the size of these, the table underneath is 8'x10'





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                  Playing since 1986: Stock, Pump, Mech, Electro, tourney, but now mostly rec.

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                    That's CAT50. CAT5 is ethernet cable.

                    Do you have any advice for felt lined "bearing"?
                    -A felt-lined bearing? No such thing, on a machine tool, that I'm aware of. The felt is likely a "wick" or primitive seal, to keep the oil in on a 'plain' bearing. (IE, a bushing, no rolling elements.)

                    Doc.
                    Doc's Machine & Airsmith Services: Creating the Strange and Wonderful since 1998!
                    The Whiteboard: Daily, occasionally paintball-related webcomic mayhem!
                    Paintball in the Movies!

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                      Originally posted by DocsMachine View Post
                      -A felt-lined bearing? No such thing, on a machine tool, that I'm aware of. The felt is likely a "wick" or primitive seal, to keep the oil in on a 'plain' bearing. (IE, a bushing, no rolling elements.)

                      Doc.
                      Looking at the exploded views again, you're right 😋
                      It has a grouve going around the brass/bronze bushing to keep it nice and oiled ... Found the book is calling for 5W on those bearings.

                      Now I need to get some 5W and 20W non detergent oil (I got access to about 50gal of 10W so I'm good that way ...)
                      Any good places to get small quantity of oil?
                      I don't want to buy another 55gal drum 😅
                      ​​​​​​
                      ​​​​
                      Love my brass ... Love my SSR ... Hard choices ...

                      looking for red/black or blue/silver phantom.
                      XEMON's phantom double sided feed


                      Keep your ATS going: Project rATS 2.0
                      My Feedback

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                        Check eBay. Lots of people like rebottling smaller quantities of semi-specialty oils for the home-shop guy. Way oils in particular- most are only commercially available in gallons, and to a typical home-shop guy, that gallon will last three lifetimes. Buying an 8 ounce bottle might cost more per-ounce, but lots less than the full gallon plus shipping.

                        Doc.
                        Doc's Machine & Airsmith Services: Creating the Strange and Wonderful since 1998!
                        The Whiteboard: Daily, occasionally paintball-related webcomic mayhem!
                        Paintball in the Movies!

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