instagram takipci satin al - instagram takipci satin al mobil odeme - takipci satin al

bahis siteleri - deneme bonusu - casino siteleri

bahis siteleri - kacak bahis - canli bahis

goldenbahis - makrobet - cepbahis

cratosslot - cratosslot giris - cratosslot

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Word of advice for the uninitiated...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Originally posted by cellophane View Post
    Go out on off days, set up some targets and snapshoot until it hurts to move. It will pay off. Also- take the time to learn good form. It will help immensely as well..
    And keep your feet tucked in behind the bunker, cuz I'm one of those a-holes that likes to shoot people out cuz they left some small part exposed.

    Comment


    • OpusX

      OpusX

      commented
      Editing a comment
      True enough, happened to me last tourney. Totally my fault, I put my foot there.

    • Falcon16

      Falcon16

      commented
      Editing a comment
      Always play tight to your bunker. I'm that guy that I'll take any small part I find to shoot.

    • lew
      lew commented
      Editing a comment
      Absolutely. That applies for any activity in which incoming fire is expected. Be aware of the angles, and stay close to cover. If it's practical, don't stay too close to cover so that you cannot manipulate your marker/weapon to affect return fire.

    #17
    Get used to and familiar with the gun you shoot, whatever it may be. The comfortable you are with it, the easier it is to put a ball where you want it.
    Feedback: https://www.mcarterbrown.com/forum/b...a’s-feedback

    Comment


    • glaman5266

      glaman5266

      commented
      Editing a comment
      Absolutely. This was my problem for many years (darn BST, lol). I recently picked up a Resurrection & that's been getting the bulk of my trigger time lately. I've been more accurate, consistent & overall better performing now that I've been working primarily with one marker. Learn your marker & get comfy with it.

    #18
    Originally posted by Interl0per View Post
    After nearly 3 decades of varying frequency of play I've reached the conclusion that ~90% of the uber-guns out there are a 200-500% premium for bells and whistles that add maybe 10% performance for >100% hassles if not just marketing hype. It's died down a lot recently, there's just not the market there used to be for ROF improvements, everyone seems to finally understand all balls of the same mass at the same speed go the same distance etc. but the bling factor still comes into play and if that's your bag, more power to you, but neophytes should remember splash ano and milling and custom valve trains add zero to the ability to hit a target while avoiding being hit and that snazzy pneumatic setups are like jet fighters, they spend more time on the ground being maintained than they do dogfighting (at least for me, Tippmanns are the only semis I've ever picked up and had just work more than 90% of the time)
    Yes & no. I agree with most of your post, especially about things like milling, valve stuff, bling, etc. 100% on board with that.
    But modern midrange electros should not be overlooked. Many markers in the midrange are excellent shooters and are very reliable & stupid easy to work on when you actually have to. The older Gtek is a good example of this. Simple, reliable, easy to work on and an overall good value IMO if you don't mind buying used. Not many bells & whistles to get in the way either. Now something like the Luxe... Yeah, no.

    Sometimes you just want something smoother, more consistent, easier to work on than your old Tippmann. Nothing wrong with that. Midrange electros can be a good choice. Many of them are also pretty much air-up-and-go & can save you a lot of potential headaches. Just be mindful of what actually gives you a performance boost & what does not (in terms of both the marker & your person).

    That being said, everyone should learn to work on their markers. I too spend a good chunk of time working on stuff for players 'cuz they just don't take the time to read the darn manual. The worst part is when whatever I say goes in one ear & out the other. Ugh, that REALLY bugs me.

    So, newbies: listen to people when they show/teach you stuff. There's lots of good people out there willing to share their knowledge. Also, read the gosh darned manual.
    New Feedback

    Comment


    • Interl0per

      Interl0per

      commented
      Editing a comment
      You’re right about midrange electros but as a poor farm boy that started with nothing and still have most of it left they fall outside my budget and thus my experience Good point though

    • Seajay
      Seajay commented
      Editing a comment
      Today's options are amazing though. For $220 you can get an Emek and enjoy the smoothness and shot quality of a "midrange" marker with the simplicity of a basic starter gun.

    • glaman5266

      glaman5266

      commented
      Editing a comment
      Interl0per- Gotcha. I do agree with you in general though. As long as it puts paint down the field that's all you really need. I still use my ProCarb on occasion.

      Seajay- Exactly. The Emek, Etha 2, Gtek, eNMey, Mini GS, all of those are good options for midrange stuff w/o all the bells and whistles. They don't break the bank either.

    #19
    This is excellent advice. Some of us who have been playing for years even forget the basics at times. I've made the mistake of switching guns too frequently.

    Comment


      #20
      Definitely would highlight the importance of a good mask to new folks. Everyone gets excited about the guns but for a new player a good mask will be the best bang- for-your-buck way to enjoy the game more. I would absolutely chose to play with a crappy rental marker and a good mask rather than a top of the line marker and a crappy mask.

      Comment


      • Falcon16

        Falcon16

        commented
        Editing a comment
        This ^^ I tell people all the time buy your own mask as your first thing. I usually recommend something like the Profiler or the E-flex with quick change lenses so cleaning is easier and I find the profiler is super comfy.

      • lew
        lew commented
        Editing a comment
        The mask is the piece of gear with which one will be most intimately connected, as well as being the most vital piece of safety equipment. Most markers are pretty reliable and shoot somewhat similarly. A bad or poorly-fitting mask will ruin one's enjoyment faster than anything else.

      • tag
        tag commented
        Editing a comment
        Totally agree - no matter what you do on the field (player, Ref, NPC, field maintenance crew, whatever-), you will need a mask to be in the 'live' areas - so spend the most/smartest money there.

      #21
      A rental mask is like rental bowling shoes, without your socks saving you.

      Add the whole seeing clearly thing, then drop the mike.

      Comment


        #22
        Originally posted by Riot View Post
        Always pee sitting down at the field.
        LOL, explain.
        https://last.fm/user/mensoman

        Comment


        • flyweightnate
          flyweightnate commented
          Editing a comment
          Keeps the target protected from incoming

        #23
        Don’t feel you need to do all the upgrades at once. Do one upgrade at a time and see how it improves your paintball gun. If you do a bunch of upgrades all at once it’s hard to measure the improvement it provides
        Last edited by Cdn_Cuda; 09-15-2020, 10:31 PM.
        Feedback: https://www.mcarterbrown.com/forum/b...a’s-feedback

        Comment


        • ChoSanJuan

          ChoSanJuan

          commented
          Editing a comment
          That and if it all takes a crap at the same time, you have to take it all apart and troubleshoot one part at a time... So why do it twice?

        #24
        I give this piece of advice all the time:

        Guys guys lets move up, they are way up there, don't worry.

        Comment


        • Arthur
          Arthur commented
          Editing a comment
          Totally agree, always lead from the front.

        • XEMON

          XEMON

          commented
          Editing a comment
          It's hilarious when I I end up on the front line with the SSR because i move up ... Alone ... 😅

        • Memornix

          Memornix

          commented
          Editing a comment
          XEMON, I wish I could like comments. This is the story of my life.

        #25
        Best advice ever!! Shoot, dont get shot!

        Comment


          #26
          Originally posted by Cdn_Cuda View Post
          Don’t feel you need to do all the upgrades at once. Do one upgrade at a time and see how it improves your paintball gun. If you do a bunch of upgrades all at once it’s hard to measure the improvement it provides
          Heck, most of these so-called 'upgrades' decrease performance in one aspect while increasing performance in another aspect, making it more of a 'tuning choice' than an upgrade, IMO.

          Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

          Comment


          • Falcon16

            Falcon16

            commented
            Editing a comment
            Great point lots of things are ok this will make the shot smoother but as a consequence it's going to decrease efficiency etc

          #27
          I got some things to add, especially for players who know they want to make this a regular hobby.

          1. A good mask is the most important starter purchase. While you ultimately need to shoot or tag to eliminate an opponent, the ability to get to good positions on the field is what will get you those good elimination opportunities. You are most helped in this regard by a mask that has a clear, fog resistant lens with a structure that lets you hear and speak and breathe easily. Overall comfort removes the distraction of scratchy foam around your eyes and hard plastic on your ears. Easy disassembly helps make quick work of cleaning it between rounds. Buy a microfiber cloth and spray bottle to go with it. Don't shove it in a gear bag without protecting the lens from scratches. I don't know the price point these days to get such a mask, but I would avoid any "starter" masks. The other thing is footwear. Sneakers ain't it. Jungle boots or work books ain't it either. You want something lightweight with good grip. Football cleats are a good all-around option, as are certain hiking shoes. There are also shoes designed specifically for paintball. I've heard good things but they are more speedball oriented than anything else. Have good ankle support for woods.

          2. Focus on having fun for your first few outings. Your best bet is to be with people of similar skill. If you're getting steamrolled all day, change who you're playing against or change what kind of game is being played. If this is at a public field, try to organize a new-player / rental only game. All that being said, it's good to have fun but it's fun to be good. In order to get good, you need to push yourself once you start getting comfortable with the game. When in doubt, you'll learn better from taking bigger risks than you will from avoiding risk outright. As an example, if you're pinned behind a bunker by someone else, don't wait for some arbitrary moment that he might go away, take the risk and see if you can turn the tables on him... take the risk to try to pin him down. By doing this, you're learning the habits of how players decide to take cover, and you will better learn how to make the same decisions. If you're ever torn between making a play for another bunker and not, take a quick look then take the chance. The first few times you try this you'll probably get shot, but you'll start to pick up on the kinds of signs that tell you if the coast is clear or not. Learn how to pin down an adversary with a single shot at a time. You'll scare a new guy by shooting his bunker, but you'll scare anybody if they have to dodge a well-placed shot every time they lean out to shoot.

          3. Gun selection: I think the best way to learn the game is with mechanical semi-auto and one hopper per round (don't even carry pods). Pump players can attest to this, movement and smart shooting do more to contribute to success than volume of fire. The best way to learn this is by having a gun that allows you to play comfortably but isn't a crutch. I think the learning curve with pumps is too high for a new guy trying to have fun. If you're going to upgrade the gun, the only thing I recommend is a freak barrel and insert kit for accuracy. Once you gain confidence that your skill alone is positively contributing to your success (and that of your team), then I would say go for a pump and play even more limited. I played for nearly 2 years straight with just a PGP and the 22+1rounds I could cram into the gun (thanks PPS). I had no replacement 10 round tubes, just a single extra 12 gram because I didn't change those between rounds. I don't think most people need to be that limited, but it's with that handicap that I learned how to win gunfights against guys with Angels and Shockers in anything from woods to speedball. Picking up an electro after playing with such limits just feels unfair. Get a great squeegee. Breaks are going to happen, it's crazy how much damage they do to your ability to shoot straight.

          4. Here are common behaviors of unskilled players that don't help you, and solutions for when you notice you're doing them.
          • Being out of range of the firefight for no good reason, or being behind cover (to the point where you can't see beyond your bunker) where you have no chance of being shot. Paintballs have very short range (with the exception of FSR or Apex/Flatline). You can generally stand completely in the open about 20-50 feet beyond where the paint from the closest opponents is bouncing on the ground. It can be advantageous to lurk around back there to figure out where to go next, or to provide guidance to teammates; but if you want to tag people, you gotta get closer. When you're safely out of range of your opponents, they are also safely out of range of you. It's pretty-much pointless to shoot back.
          • Having your back against a bunker (facing away from the adversary). You're not much safer than if you are facing forward, but are drastically increasing the effort and time it takes to peek out and take a shot. If you need to be tight against a bunker for cover, face the edge of the bunker where the threat is coming from and push your shoulder into it. Have your barrel pointed toward the edge to speed up your reaction time to threats. Be careful not to...
          • ...Unintentionally stick your gun/body parts outside of cover. The amount of times I've tagged a guy in the heel or knee or hopper or barrel... I can't even count.
          • The newbie squat. Experienced guys will know exactly what I'm talking about. A player squatting on the balls of their feet (horrendously unstable and hard to getup'n'go), holding their gun forward, up, and away from the body (not a stable shooting platform, can't possibly be aiming). The other bad habit is tucking the tank under the armpit. Hold a paintball gun like you're holding a rifle. Put the back of the tank into your shoulder. Rest the front of the gun in your forward hand. Have a relaxed grip with your trigger hand. Aim along the barrel. As for posture, if you're standing in a bunker, stand in a comfortable position from which you can rotate your torso. Don't be afraid to mess with your footing. If you need to stay tight against the bunker, stand with with your belly and crotch facing the bunker (think pancaking your body against it, especially if it's an inflatable). If you need to crouch, be on one knee.
          • Clustering into one bunker. If there are empty bunkers nearby, but you and your crew are all piled into one, you've put yourself at a horrendous disadvantage. If you need a basic gameplan to build off of, send one person to a defensible bunker (as a new guy, I would consider "defensible" as something that can easily be maneuvered behind without exposing yourself to enemy fire) as far as he can to the left, send another as far as possible to the right. With more than two on your team, send the third guy up the middle. With more than that, at least spread out to all available bunkers at the close side of the field. With experience, you'll learn how to make better decisions for each field.
          • Running around with a dirty mask/gun. Your mask is your lifeline. It protects you from total blindness, but also enables you to actually see and hear the environment. Clean it between rounds. Your gun's ability to shoot straight and stay functional depends minimizing dirt inside. Clean the barrel and chamber (at minimum) after a break. Clean the internals when you can. If the gun has any parts exposed to open air, keep those parts clear of soil or sand. With that, using paint found on the ground is an absolute last resort. If you're at that point, you've shot too much anyway. More than likely that paint you found is going to break when you shoot it. Don't forget that many fields allow barrel tagging or patting the bunker as a means of eliminating people. You can also convince someone to surrender. These methods of eliminating people are often more satisfying than shooting a person. One of my favorite 10 minutes of paintball was a 4v4 where I single-handedly eliminated the entire opposing team by shooting 2, then (out of ammo) scaring the other 2 by running up on them and yelling surrender as I unexpectedly appeared around the edges of their bunkers.

          Comment


          • glaman5266

            glaman5266

            commented
            Editing a comment
            Good post.

            "I don't know the price point these days to get such a mask, but I would avoid any "starter" masks."

            Many starter masks are not very good, but pretty much every mask is rated for adequate eye protection. What you're really paying for is fit, finish and comfort. To elaborate:
            You get what you pay for when it comes to paintball masks. If the one that fits your face best and has the protection you want then BUY IT. Regardless of price. If a $50 JT Proshield is what works best for you, then buy it. If that $100+ mask works for you then buy it. Go to a proshop and try a bunch on and buy the one that works best for you. Your comfort is incredibly important if you plan on spending a bunch of time playing. Price should NOT be a factor in a mask purchase.

            Starter masks will provide adequate eye protection. They are just fine. But it NEEDS to fit your face properly & provide the face/jaw/neck protection you want. If a starter mask works for you, then great. It'll do the job. But consider as many options as you can.

            As for price, I would look into anything $50 and above. The JT Proshield is a solid choice for a starter mask & I use them almost exclusively. I actually switched from my "higher end" E-Flex to the Proshield a couple years ago, and I've been playing for 18 years & owned many different masks. They run about $50.
            The only one under $50 I would consider would be the Empire Helix. I have one (well, an older model with slightly better foam), and they are pretty comfortable & don't pinch any part of your head. Solid frontal protection too, though the jawbone coverage is slightly lacking if you have a large/tall head. They usually go for $40.

          #28
          My first marker was a F2, don't miss it. Mostly have played with a CCM S6 for the last 12 yrs, I don't play alot, but snap shooting, you know where the paint is going. End of a day of paintball, tried a different S6, different grips, threw me off. I could come close, but was not as accurate. Good advice in this thread.

          Comment


            #29
            If you really want to switch markers out, I have found getting a barrel system you like and feel comfortable with helps. I look at the same barrel tip no matter which gun I'm shooting. I have been using my Sly system with a 16" barrel for years now. I have SP and AC threaded backs for most of the guns I will ever use. I have recently switched to a Carbon 14" and though I'm still getting used to it, I find it doesn't matter which gun it's attached to. I know where to point it to hit my target.

            I agree with some of you about the first gun you own. I don't miss my first gun at all. Now my first high end gun, I should have never sold. If you are sentimental about stuff then hold on to that first gun. Otherwise, you probably won't care. I swap guns all the time and there are very few that I wish I still had. I like to buy, use and re-sell. But one of my boys is more sentimental than me and doesn't want to let go of anything. I don't feel that way but I get it.

            For me, playing paintball comes down to 3 areas that make it perfect for me. 33.33% of it is the people at the field. I love being able to go and talk about paintball to people that might actually listen and care. Maybe not as much as I do but heck I can talk paintball and not see their eyes glaze over. My wife and friends don't want to hear about it. 33.33% of it has to do with the equipment. I love the gear. I am always wanting to try new gear and see what I like best. I like getting my gear ready to play and cleaning it up after. And the final 33.33% is the competition and challenge. I'm not as competitive as I used to be but I still want to go out and play well. I want to get out on the field and shoot. I enjoy pushing myself to get better. That's what makes paintball the perfect sport for me. I have fun because I get to do those 3 things every time I go play. Even if I don't get to talk too much or I didn't have my gear work right, I still can manage to have fun.
            -------------
            Gear: PE Emek w/FLE | Etha 2 w/FLE | Upgraded Silver Pimp | Carbon IC Barrel | 48/4500 FS Tank | CTRL
            Clothing: CRBN X Push Black Smoke Mask | Exalt Bounce Cap | Carbon SC Shirt | CK Platinum Red Pants (Winter) | CK Halen Joggers (Summer) | Salomon XA Pro 3D Shoes | Exalt Death Grip Gloves | Jerseys Clinic Jersey (Winter) | HK Eject Fire 3+2 Pod Pack
            Extra Weight: GoPro Hero 3 | HK Mask Mount | PE Rolling Bag | Guru Gun Stands | SplatRack Stand | Mad Fuego Barrel Socks | 50/4500 Pure Energy Tank | Husky 37in. Rolling Box
            Home Field: Hoppers, GA

            Comment

            Working...
            X