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Word of advice for the uninitiated...

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  • DavidBoren
    commented on 's reply
    Don't take life too seriously, or you'll never get out alive...

  • Falcon16
    replied
    Don't take the game too seriously. It's a game after all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Seajay
    replied
    I'd put #4 to the top of OP.

    Make sure YOU are happy and comfortable, which means fed and hydrated. You can always change how you are playing or the field but if you are not in a happy place, no amount of paintballing, gear, or money will improve your day. Go in tired and thirsty, leave worse off.

    To add, condition to how you want to play. If you intend to speed demon around the course, train for it. I'm not saying go pro, just exercise periodically, jog a bit, keep up stretches. This goes back to you as a person being in a state of well being.

    Don't push past your limit, play to your limit. This is a game, so have fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • Interl0per
    replied
    Originally posted by DavidBoren View Post
    3) Set yourself up with good peripherals... mask, mask bag, gear bag, barrel swab, pod swab if you use pods, GOOD TOOLS, tank cover (protect your investments)... it will pay for itself in the long run.
    This can't be overstated, being able to quickly and easily take care of barrel breaks, mask hits, leaky o-rings, etc. etc. at the field will make your day so much better than that new weiner whistle

    Leave a comment:


  • Interl0per
    replied
    Originally posted by spikeball View Post
    I see this every so often at my field I frequent, and it's kind of in the same vein as number two; a more expensive marker does not make the player.

    Personally, I've been playing with sub $250 markers for YEARS without being out-gunned.

    The fun element is quickly forgotten in the competitive environment. In a weird way, I'm kind of excited when someone shoots me out. It means I'm playing to my limits.
    After nearly 3 decades of varying frequency of play I've reached the conclusion that ~90% of the uber-guns out there are a 200-500% premium for bells and whistles that add maybe 10% performance for >100% hassles if not just marketing hype. It's died down a lot recently, there's just not the market there used to be for ROF improvements, everyone seems to finally understand all balls of the same mass at the same speed go the same distance etc. but the bling factor still comes into play and if that's your bag, more power to you, but neophytes should remember splash ano and milling and custom valve trains add zero to the ability to hit a target while avoiding being hit and that snazzy pneumatic setups are like jet fighters, they spend more time on the ground being maintained than they do dogfighting (at least for me, Tippmanns are the only semis I've ever picked up and had just work more than 90% of the time)

    Leave a comment:


  • Interl0per
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • spikeball
    replied
    I see this every so often at my field I frequent, and it's kind of in the same vein as number two; a more expensive marker does not make the player.

    Personally, I've been playing with sub $250 markers for YEARS without being out-gunned.

    The fun element is quickly forgotten in the competitive environment. In a weird way, I'm kind of excited when someone shoots me out. It means I'm playing to my limits.

    Leave a comment:


  • punkncat
    commented on 's reply
    Yup, most people don't understand that spending $20-30 more on your paint offsets thousands in a "better marker" and "better barrels" shooting shit paint.

  • coyote
    replied
    If you are inclined to splurge;
    1 A top quality mask.
    2 Field time. The more you play the more you develop fundamental skills.
    3 A great case of paint can be a glorious experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • lew
    replied
    Points 1 and 2 are far too subjective and open-ended.

    1) I sold my first gun and the dozen following that one long a go and don't miss any of them. My current collection makes me far happier.

    2) Technical ability and skill and the collection one can amass because of those has little to no correlation with playing skill. I always bring at least three markers to the field and am a pretty good player. Someone with one gun may be new to the sport, may not be comfortable enough with a paintball gun to consider adding another one to the lineup, may not have the funds to play/practice often (although I know all of us MCB-ers are flat broke ), and so on...

    Points 3, 4, and 5 are spot-on.👌🤘

    Leave a comment:


  • ATBen
    replied
    Agreed, except I'll always bring three guns to the field. I like variety, all my children are perfect. My kid on the other hand...

    Leave a comment:


  • punkncat
    replied
    I have to say that most of these kids wouldn't know the working side of many tools if it BIT them.
    I would suggest to a new player that IF you are mechanically inclined and even mildly skilled....almost every marker made and certainly all the modern ones have a YouTube video showing exactly how to disassemble, service, and reassemble your marker. Many of the new markers (and I REALLY have to give a nod to PE here) have beautiful color manuals that go into almost every aspect of the marker.

    If after looking at those items you are still unsure there is almost positively someone at the field or your local shop that will likely show you how to do it. (In this case LOOK for that fellow with the huge collection) IF after they SHOW you in person and you still have doubts, take it/send it to a professional.

    As that old guy at the field with the (now) big collection I honest to goodness spend more of my time being asked to fix things that these kids don't care to understand than I do playing. 99.95% of them don't even know how to change modes on their LCD/OLED screen starship. I don't mind, but the trend isn't lessening.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jonnydread
    replied
    Originally posted by DavidBoren View Post
    5) Have fun. It's just a game. That's not to say you shouldn't be dedicated, take it seriously, move with a purpose, and adhere to violence of action... all of those are certainly helpful, if not necessary. But don't forget to have fun.
    I feel like this gets forgotten so often on the field. Paintball is fun, let it be fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • freedom
    replied
    Originally posted by DavidBoren View Post
    Others may add to this if they have something to add
    nah, what you just said is perfection

    Leave a comment:


  • DavidBoren
    started a topic Word of advice for the uninitiated...

    Word of advice for the uninitiated...

    For anyone who may be just starting out...

    Are there any newbies on MCB, or are we all dinosaurs around here that remember paintballing before the turn of the millennium?

    Anyways, just some thoughts and advice, a few things I have learned along the way that might make life easier for someone starting out...

    1) Keep your first marker, no matter what it is. You will appreciate it someday later, I guarantee it.

    2) Less is more. Always fear the man with one gun, because they know how to use it. Having a horde is cool and all, but it can be a distraction. Pick something and perfect it.

    3) Set yourself up with good peripherals... mask, mask bag, gear bag, barrel swab, pod swab if you use pods, GOOD TOOLS, tank cover (protect your investments)... it will pay for itself in the long run.

    4) Drink water and eat properly before you play,, so you can play as much as possible when you're out there. In order to get better, you need trigger time. You can't play every match all day if you're falling out.

    5) Have fun. It's just a game. That's not to say you shouldn't be dedicated, take it seriously, move with a purpose, and adhere to violence of action... all of those are certainly helpful, if not necessary. But don't forget to have fun.

    I am sure there's more, but lists are boring. Others may add to this if they have something to add, there is a lot of experience on MCB, lots of lessons learned the hard way, too.
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