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Old 10-12-2017, 09:25 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by freedom View Post
runs to go check the bath oil capsules...
That's exactly where my mind went!
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Old 10-13-2017, 12:14 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Thanks for the link Saint TGM. That is the very article I read in my high school cafeteria and decided then and there to open my own field. In 1983 I did, and have blamed Allan Ross (who showed me the article) ever since for the best years of my life as both a field owner and player.

As I recall (insert wavy lines to simulate flashback sequence) it was a case of what there was vs what there could be. Paintballs (pellets, as we called them then, with an onion tied to our belts...) were made for marking tree and cattle by this company from Iron Mountain MI. The Nelspot was the marker that fired them. Oil-based they were, because that is what they were for, marking cattle and trees. To shoot them at humans was a new idea, everlasting thanks be to Bob Guernsey!

Since they were already available in .68, why should anyone try and make a marker to shoot anything else? Once .68 caliber water-based paint pellets (paintballs) became available, and more markers were being produced to use them (Sheridan PGP, Mark 1 Oozie, Brass Eagle Nightmare, etc), marker manufacturers started to convince paintball manufacturers to try different calibers. .62s for the Tippmann SMG 60, the Great American Airgun Game AGA .62 (and Great Canadian Airgun Game too) and the PSI Stinger (a Canadian manufacturer of a nelson-based M16 style pump action marker). .50s for the Crosman 3357. .375s for the Model 85, A .43 oval shaped projectile (mag fed) was fielded and immediately rejected. Finned paintballs were proposed and failed miserably. Debates raged about the best caliber, but in the end commerce won. Beta vs VHS, but in the paintball world .68s were the most popular, and effectively were the most produced. Marker producers went back to producing markers for the paintballs that were most widely available and .68 has ruled ever since.

End of flashback
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Old 10-13-2017, 02:02 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by magmoormaster View Post
I remember hearing something about paintballs being made on the same encapsulation machines as horse medicine.
No, those were the Safety "Macho Fire" Paintballs. My estimation is that they didn't do all that well because they were simply not ellipsoidal enough (however, they would likely hurt more if they were).

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Thanks for the link Saint TGM. That is the very article I read in my high school cafeteria and decided then and there to open my own field. In 1983 I did, and have blamed Allan Ross (who showed me the article) ever since for the best years of my life as both a field owner and player.

As I recall (insert wavy lines to simulate flashback sequence) it was a case of what there was vs what there could be. Paintballs (pellets, as we called them then, with an onion tied to our belts...) were made for marking tree and cattle by this company from Iron Mountain MI. The Nelspot was the marker that fired them. Oil-based they were, because that is what they were for, marking cattle and trees. To shoot them at humans was a new idea, everlasting thanks be to Bob Guernsey!

Since they were already available in .68, why should anyone try and make a marker to shoot anything else? Once .68 caliber water-based paint pellets (paintballs) became available, and more markers were being produced to use them (Sheridan PGP, Mark 1 Oozie, Brass Eagle Nightmare, etc), marker manufacturers started to convince paintball manufacturers to try different calibers. .62s for the Tippmann SMG 60, the Great American Airgun Game AGA .62 (and Great Canadian Airgun Game too) and the PSI Stinger (a Canadian manufacturer of a nelson-based M16 style pump action marker). .50s for the Crosman 3357. .375s for the Model 85, A .43 oval shaped projectile (mag fed) was fielded and immediately rejected. Finned paintballs were proposed and failed miserably. Debates raged about the best caliber, but in the end commerce won. Beta vs VHS, but in the paintball world .68s were the most popular, and effectively were the most produced. Marker producers went back to producing markers for the paintballs that were most widely available and .68 has ruled ever since.

End of flashback
The thoughts behind alternative calibers were always misguided attempts to get an edge in performance, or particular design requirements (i.e. low mass for the model 85, or something that could be retrofitted onto an existing CO2 pellet revolver). The Safety paintballs never made it to market- They did a demo at a big game or tournament (I can't remember which) and they simply didn't perform better enough to generate enough interest.
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Old 10-13-2017, 05:49 PM   #14 (permalink)
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I remember think how ridiculous the name "Macho Fire" was! They even took out a full page in APG to flog them...
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Old 10-14-2017, 01:50 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I always thought that when the tool and die maker for the bath oil bead mold made the die, he used an 11/16th inch ball mill
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Old 10-14-2017, 04:40 PM   #16 (permalink)
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This is fascinating. I actually wish they would. make them slightly larger.

Someone on McB had a story about the ironmen having oversize paintballs made at some point.. 73 caliber? They'd shoot straight and farther than .68...

Last edited by uglyduckling; 10-14-2017 at 07:33 PM.
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Old 10-15-2017, 02:55 PM   #17 (permalink)
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https://www.amazon.com/SmartVet-602-.../dp/B00L2G5RSG
.90 cal, just gotta find capsules that aren't full of insecticide, lol

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Old 10-15-2017, 05:17 PM   #18 (permalink)
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there was already .50 .62 and .65 and .70 call in the 80s, .62 was extremely popular in fact in NZ its all we ran as the call suited or bush fields and the increase FPS was also an advantage...
so I assume there was already encapsulating machines for all these calls and more, FYI .brass plumbing pipe was perfect .62 sizing we made a few barrels out of this.
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Old 10-15-2017, 05:21 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Third of Five View Post
and the PSI Stinger (a Canadian manufacturer of a nelson-based M16 style pump action marker). .End of flashback
actually manufactured in NZ and sold in North America so as not break contractual agreements with Tippmann when we sold them the design for the open bolt semi auto.
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Old 10-15-2017, 09:14 PM   #20 (permalink)
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The PSI Stinger I tested back in the day was in .62 (late 80's if I recall) with a brass barrel, M16 Style cast frame and foregrip, dual armed pump and nelson internals. The raised sights made it easier to use with a mask as the back bottle ASA put the tank straight back. It was heavy and the paintballs we had in .62 were either Nelson or RP Scherer. Decent accuracy but adjusting velocity was tedious as it required re-springing. I was led to believe they were manufactured in western Canada, but then again the supplier was a sleazy bastard and I would be surprised if it was false.
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