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Old 05-19-2018, 09:11 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Old 05-19-2018, 10:47 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Thanks greenmnt. Will take advice.


Critical, I appreciate the input, but already have a nice entry/mid level mirrorless. Sony a6000
The reason why I advise using a crappy camera is because you most likely wont know what you need until you need it. Photography can be a rather deep, expensive rabbit hole to travel down. The 15+ years experience I've gathered was all because at some point in time I wanted something I wasn't getting from my current setup, and/or from current understanding of photography. Without a formal teacher with you to hold your hand and walk you through it all, the only way you know what avenue to pursue are from your limits.

I still would advise buying a cheap camera, maybe a pocket point and click, and being using that. There are no shortcuts to knowledge. If you want I can write up a bullet list of things you will need to know, technical and artistical (unless someone else gets mentions it already in this post). That should start you on your way.
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Old 05-19-2018, 11:23 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Old 05-20-2018, 08:39 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Thank you!
both these guys have youtube video to watch and will help you out too.

matt granger

and

jarded Jared Polin
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Old 05-21-2018, 03:17 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Nice!

I used to work selling cameras/teaching beginners.

I'm going to echo a lot of the advice above, YouTube, experiment, etc.

You have a nice camera. The Sony's are awesome! And that's good. I'd always suggest getting the best you can afford because cameras are the closest we get to time machines, and the more you spend, generally the better you get.

It's been a while, but the Sony A7's were the best bang for buck full frame out there... Just the lens selection was lacking compared to the Nikons and Canons. But all of the Sony's were really good quality performers since they seem to be grabbing the opportunity to lead on mirrorless format cameras.

Anyhow, a few starting points, some of which you're already on top of:
1. Learn the dial/buttons on your camera
I used to use this as a beginner's starting point, because it actually teaches you a lot about basic photography.

2. Don't be afraid of Auto!
Auto focus or auto mode. You can use it to see what the camera would set everything to and then copy it and change settings in manual mode. And Sony's auto is one of the best!

3.Everything comes AFTER focus.
You can fix a lot of issues in post, but not focus.

4.Shoot RAW
If your model lets you, shoot as high res or uncompressed as possible! Memory is cheap, and it's easier to shrink the photos later.

5.Don't delete until you see your photos on a computer!
Barring an accidental picture of your foot, don't delete. Some pictures might surprise you when they looked bad on the camera.

6. ISO/Shutter/F-stop
Think of the settings as a balance. If you increase something, you have to decrease something else. The light meter should tell you where you're balancing is getting you.

6a. ISO - always as low as possible, but pump it up to get proper exposure.
6b.Shutter - Don't go below ~1/80th hand held
6c. F - small number usually = small depth of field

There's more, but my battery is dying. There's some good starting points I hope help.

Maybe I'll update this another time if it's useful.

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Old 05-21-2018, 09:47 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Awesome information, Thank you!

Can you just tell me in laymen's terms about shutter / aperture.

What I mean is... Which one will allow for a clearer background versus which one will allow for the whole range in focus?

I want to know how it directly affects the picture rather than what it is doing to the camera (exposure times and such). I will also learn that stuff, but for now this is the wall I am hitting. I can understand that a certain thing will leave the shutter open longer, but right now that isn't what I need. I need to take the good picture first and then understand why. It's just my personal way of learning.

Thank you!
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Old 05-21-2018, 11:01 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Funny, that was the next thing I wasgoing to talk about.

6d. F stop (aperture) big number generally means wider depth of field.

If you want everything in focus, generally that means an F5.6 or higher.

Keep in mind I'm throwing numbers around that are common for a digital single lens reflex (DSLR). Numbers may vary a little, but the concept is the same.

To truly answer your question about how to get everything in focus, there's a couple of things that depend on context, keeping the balancing act concept in mind.

Actually, here's a picture that explains it very well:
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Old 05-21-2018, 11:14 PM   #18 (permalink)
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ISO you can kind of ignore, because you'll always want it as low as possible or you'll have to crank it to see anything other than black.

Aperture (F-stop) decides how wide the iris is going to open, shutter speed is for how long.

So it depends what look you're going for and ultimately what is lighting your shot.

Indoor/outdoor makes a huge difference.

What are you trying to shoot?

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Old 05-30-2018, 06:53 PM   #19 (permalink)
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I saw this and instantly thought of you.

F1.1 Sony compatible aps-c lens! It is the opposite of everything in focus, but a dream lens for photos that POP!

F1.1 is the maximum theoretical aperture a lens iris can open. They usually cost a lot.

It would be better if it was smaller than 50mm (75mm frame equivalent) so that the photographer could get closer to the subject. Still, something to consider and a bit of a marketing achievement.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRt2mNFxdDI
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Old 05-30-2018, 07:26 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Step 1: be a hot girl
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Step 3: take a black and white photo of a lawn chair and its shadow
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