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    Resoldering Board Parts?

    I have an SP1 Blackheart board with an on/off LED that's no good. So my questions are: where would I get a replacement LED; and would I be able to use a normal soldering iron to replace it?

    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk


    #2
    LEDs really aren't a big deal to swap out if need be. They are rated for their current draw, and will fit into one of many form factors. If it's surface mount, use a micrometer to measure width and length. There are charts online where you can look up the dimensions and get the form factor code. -

    Soldering wise..depends on your skill level. It's easy to screw up small traces by using too much heat or otherwise abusing the board somehow. Easiest to damage traces while removing the dead part.

    A good way to practice component removal is just find a dead board from any electronic device you can find and practice part removal. You'll get the hang of it pretty quick. Best not to make your blackheart board your first attempt.

    Or find someone nearby to do it for you. A cell phone repair joint will probably take care of it for you if you give them the LED.

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      #3
      It get the led from digi key likely. Im not sure what yoy need, but they have everything when it comes to components.

      And yes you ahould be able to solder it with the exception of a nonconformal coating ( waterproofing) gwtting taken off.


      PaintbaLl boards are usually covered in a coating to make them more water resistant. you may have to scratch the coating off of the pads prior to heating.


      The hardest part is the de solder imo. You need to get everything hot enough to pull the old led off, but the board pads can cook off shortly after rwaching said temp.

      What kind of iron do you have? Tip? Solder sucker or wick rope?

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        #4
        Almost not worth the effort..... The sp1 Blackheart boards are In a race to which breaks first. They led switch or the solenoid

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks for the input guys. I'll snap some pictures later to show what I'm working with. I don't have much experience soldering, so I might take it to a repair shop or see if one of my computer geek friends can do it.

          As for this being futile; I don't think so. I have both the stock board and this one, both with good solenoids, and I don't torque down the screws like a fool.

          Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

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            #6
            Where are you located again? IIRC its Canada. Id say Ill take a stab at it for ya but i wouldnt wanna be liable if I failed. If you are not in the states it isnt gonna be worth postage.

            On the other hand, I soldered for a few years for an occupation, and solder work is still part of my current job. I am pretty good with an iron, but stuff can happen.

            If its worth shipping costs to you. Ill give it the ole college try. Shoot me a PM if interested.

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              #7
              By popular demand here are pictures of my soldering iron, and the LED(s) in question. Not sure which LED it is or if it's both.

              Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

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                #8
                So upon further inspection, it appears that the Blackheart board is missing the LED. all together? Assuming it's in the same place as the LED on the stock board.

                Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

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                  #9
                  I wouldn't solder anything with that dinosaur of a soldering iron.

                  You'll most likely do more damage than good with it. You need something with a finer tip.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Those guns are usually over 100W and will wreck PCB traces in no time. They are only good for wire soldering and things like chassis ground. Butane torches/welding usually work better in those cases anyway.

                    Even a pencil iron could be too much unless it's 50W or less and has a temperature control of some sort. A good setup won't be worth investing in unless you are using it a lot. I use my rig almost everyday.

                    Desoldering to remove a part usually requires more heat than attaching a part. Desoldering braid or a vacuum pump would be the way to go. Never use physical force to remove a part.

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                      #11
                      Thanks guys, I figured that would probably be the case. I once used it to fix the contacts in a microswitch, and that was pretty intensive. I'll see what computer repair companies around me do board level repair.

                      Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

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                        #12
                        Here is a reasonably priced Weller WLC100 40-Watt Soldering Station pencil style solder iron for this type of DIY project. It is ~$40 on amazon but you can get it other places.

                        Get some smaller tips to change out as needed.
                        You want a tip that crosses the pads you are working with with out overhanging the pad.
                        Work with the highest temperature you can (practice) and not burn the PCB.
                        Buy Eutectic Rosin Core Solder (63./37) it has no plastic state it goes from solid to liquid instantly once heated to the melting point. 60/40 will work but is harder to get a good joint with due to having a plastic state This will help with getting a non-disturbed solder joint and makes pulling the old part. Not sure why people cheap out 63/37 is essentially the same price and makes life way easier.
                        Tin the solder tip before trying to solder/de-solder (add a thin coating of fresh solder)
                        use a little solder at the junction of the solder tip and the pad to "bridge" the tip this will aid in quickly heating the pad/solder to melt temp

                        "When you are asked if you can do a job, tell 'em, 'Certainly I can!' Then get busy and find out how to do it." - Theodore Roosevelt

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