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Old 07-12-2012, 01:54 PM   #61 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by haxorwear View Post
I believe ownership of a trademark is a powerful leverage in the dispute and seizure policies of domain registrars.
WHOIS does show croudgather as the owner of pbnation.com and paintballnation.com, but USPTO.gov shows PBNation LLC as the owner of the trademarks pbnation and paintballnation.

If you read the Purchase Agreement, its specifically only for the website domain, and related software. They make no mention of the trademarks

Sanjay does they own all intellectual property related to pbnation, but thats not what the Purchase Agreement says. I'm sure the lawyers have all realized this by now and are all knee deep in it.
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Old 07-13-2012, 05:57 AM   #62 (permalink)
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Oh joy ...
I want to Buy it and link it directly to goatse.
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:38 AM   #63 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by alpha434 View Post
Step one... Buy PBnation.com

Step two... Redirect to MCB.com


Epic lulz ensue.
Epic lulz for everyone that hates MCB more like...I don't think I'd be able to withstand the influx of 1d107s th4t t41k l1ke dis. Or the retards doing that stupid H hand gesture. Or all the agg.
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Old 07-13-2012, 08:44 AM   #64 (permalink)
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Remember years back when the page header used to state "home of deer gore, and some paintball stuff."

Maybe they're finally selling the deer gore
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Old 07-13-2012, 12:48 PM   #65 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by LUKE View Post
Remember years back when the page header used to state "home of deer gore, and some paintball stuff."

Maybe they're finally selling the deer gore
if you google deer gore, you'll still find that thread as the #1 link
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Old 07-13-2012, 02:00 PM   #66 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Megatron1 View Post
Epic lulz for everyone that hates MCB more like...I don't think I'd be able to withstand the influx of 1d107s th4t t41k l1ke dis. Or the retards doing that stupid H hand gesture. Or all the agg.
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Old 07-13-2012, 02:03 PM   #67 (permalink)
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Urban Dictionary: Deer Gore


"Pictures involving gruesome death of deer, normally caused by a car. More blood is better, common associated with pbnation where it first originated."


"Possibly the most popular thread ever to be posted on PBNation.com.

Simply google search "Deer Gore" and click the first link given and you will behold the most wonderful and most popular thread in the history of one of the most populated and greatest forums ever created by mankind. "
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Old 07-13-2012, 02:42 PM   #68 (permalink)
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Trade value of Eleventy Zillion Dolars? LOL

But in all seriousness, this looks odd. IIRC Crowdgather, Inc paid like US$ 1 Million for PB Nation just over a year ago. It just wouldn't make sense to sell a small part of the brands while keeping the 1 Million users web site.
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Old 07-14-2012, 10:33 AM   #69 (permalink)
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Trademark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A trademark, trade mark, or trade-mark[1] is a distinctive sign or indicator used by an individual, business organization, or other legal entity to identify for consumers that the products or services on or with which the trademark appears originate from a unique source, designated for a specific market,[2] and to distinguish its products or services from those of other entities.

A trademark may be designated by the following symbols:

™ (for an unregistered trade mark, that is, a mark used to promote or brand goods)
℠ (for an unregistered service mark, that is, a mark used to promote or brand services)
(for a registered trademark)

A trademark is typically a name, word, phrase, logo, symbol, design, image, or a combination of these elements.[3] There is also a range of non-conventional trademarks comprising marks which do not fall into these standard categories, such as those based on color, smell, or sound.

The owner of a trademark may initiate legal proceedings for trademark infringement to prevent unauthorized use of that trademark. Most countries require formal registration of a trademark as a precondition for pursuing this type of action. A few countries, including the United States and Canada, also recognize common law trademark rights, which means action can be taken to protect a trademark that is in use but not registered. Generally, common law trademarks do not offer the holder as much legal protection as registered trademarks.

The term trademark is also used informally to refer to any distinguishing attribute by which an individual is readily identified, such as the well-known characteristics of celebrities. When a trademark is used in relation to services rather than products, it may sometimes be called a service mark, particularly in the United States.[3]


Registration
The law considers a trademark to be a form of property. Proprietary rights in relation to a trademark may be established through actual use in the marketplace, or through registration of the mark with the trademarks office (or "trademarks registry") of a particular jurisdiction. In some jurisdictions, trademark rights can be established through either or both means. Certain jurisdictions generally do not recognize trademarks rights arising through use. If trademark owners do not hold registrations for their marks in such jurisdictions, the extent to which they will be able to enforce their rights through trademark infringement proceedings will therefore be limited. In cases of dispute, this disparity of rights is often referred to as "first to file" as opposed to "first to use." Other countries such as Germany offer a limited amount of common law rights for unregistered marks where to gain protection, the goods or services must occupy a highly significant position in the marketplace — where this could be 40% or more market share for sales in the particular class of goods or services.

In the United States the registration process entails several steps prior to a trademark receiving its Certificate of Registration.[9] First, an Applicant, the individual or entity applying for the registration, files an application to register the respective trademark. The application is then placed in line in the order it was received to be examined by an examining attorney for the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Second, following a period of anywhere from three to six months the application is reviewed by an examining attorney to make sure that it complies with all requirements in order to be entitled to registration.[10] This review includes procedural matters such as making sure the applicant's goods or services are identified properly. It also includes more substantive matters such as making sure the applicant's mark is not merely descriptive or likely to cause confusion with a pre-existing applied-for or registered mark.[11] If the application runs afoul of any requirement, the examining attorney will issue an office action requiring the applicant to address certain issues or refusals prior to registration of the mark. Third, and after the examination of the mark has concluded with no issues to be addressed or an applicant has responded adequately to an examining attorney's concerns, the application will be published for opposition. During this 30-day period third-parties who may be affected by the registration of the trademark may step forward to file an Opposition Proceeding to stop the registration of the mark. If an Opposition proceeding is filed it institutes a case before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board to determine both the validity of the grounds for the opposition as well as the ability of the applicant to register the mark at issue.[12] Fourth, provided that no third-party opposes the registration of the mark during the opposition period or the opposition is ultimately decided in the applicant's favor the mark will be registered in due course.

Outside of the United States the registration process is substantially similar to that found in the U.S. save for one notable exception in many countries: registration occurs prior to the opposition proceeding. In short, once an application is reviewed by an examiner and found to be entitled to registration a registration certificate is issued subject to the mark being open to opposition for a period of typically 6 months from the date of registration.

A registered trademark confers a bundle of exclusive rights upon the registered owner, including the right to exclusive use of the mark in relation to the products or services for which it is registered. The law in most jurisdictions also allows the owner of a registered trademark to prevent unauthorized use of the mark in relation to products or services which are identical or "colourfully" similar to the "registered" products or services, and in certain cases, prevent use in relation to entirely dissimilar products or services. The test is always whether a consumer of the goods or services will be confused as to the identity of the source or origin. An example may be a very large multinational brand such as "Sony" where a non-electronic product such as a pair of sunglasses might be assumed to have come from Sony Corporation of Japan despite not being a class of goods that Sony has rights in.

Once trademark rights are established in a particular jurisdiction, these rights are generally only enforceable in that jurisdiction, a quality which is sometimes known as territoriality. However, there is a range of international trademark laws and systems which facilitate the protection of trademarks in more than one jurisdiction (see International trademark laws below).

Maintaining rights

Trademarks rights must be maintained through actual lawful use of the trademark. These rights will cease if a mark is not actively used for a period of time, normally 5 years in most jurisdictions. In the case of a trademark registration, failure to actively use the mark in the lawful course of trade, or to enforce the registration in the event of infringement, may also expose the registration itself to become liable for an application for the removal from the register after a certain period of time on the grounds of "non-use". It is not necessary for a trademark owner to take enforcement action against all infringement if it can be shown that the owner perceived the infringement to be minor and inconsequential. This is designed to prevent owners from continually being tied up in litigation for fear of cancellation. An owner can at any time commence action for infringement against a third party as long as it had not previously notified the third party of its discontent following third party use and then failed to take action within a reasonable period of time (called acquiescence). The owner can always reserve the right to take legal action until a court decides that the third party had gained notoriety which the owner 'must' have been aware of. It will be for the third party to prove their use of the mark is substantial as it is the onus of a company using a mark to check they are not infringing previously registered rights. In the US, owing to the overwhelming number of unregistered rights, trademark applicants are advised to perform searches not just of the trademark register but of local business directories and relevant trade press. Specialized search companies perform such tasks prior to application.

All jurisdictions with a mature trademark registration system provide a mechanism for removal in the event of such non use, which is usually a period of either three or five years. The intention to use a trademark can be proven by a wide range of acts as shown in the "Wooly Bull" and "Ashton v Harlee" cases.

In the U.S., failure to use a trademark for this period of time, aside from the corresponding impact on product quality, will result in abandonment of the mark, whereby any party may use the mark. An abandoned mark is not irrevocably in the public domain, but may instead be re-registered by any party which has re-established exclusive and active use, and must be associated or linked with the original mark owner. If a court rules that a trademark has become "generic" through common use (such that the mark no longer performs the essential trademark function and the average consumer no longer considers that exclusive rights attach to it), the corresponding registration may also be ruled invalid.

For examples, see trademark distinctiveness.

Unlike other forms of intellectual property (e.g., patents and copyrights) a registered trademark can, theoretically, last forever. So long as a trademark's use is continuous a trademark holder may keep the mark registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office by filing Section 8 Affidavit(s) of Continuous Use as well as Section 9 Applications for renewal, as required.

Specifically, once registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office the owner of a trademark is required to file a Section 8 Affidavit of Continuous Use to maintain the registration between the 5th and 6th year anniversaries of the registration of the mark or during the 6-month grace period following the 6th-year anniversary of the registration.[13] Note, if the Section 8 Affidavit is filed during the 6-month grace period additional fees to file the Affidavit with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will apply.[14]

In addition to requirement above, U.S. trademark registrations are also required to be renewed on or about every 10-year anniversary of the registration of the trademark. The procedure for 10-year renewals is somewhat different from that for the 5th-6th year renewal. In brief, registrants are required to file both a Section 8 Affidavit of Continuous Use as well as a Section 9 Application for Renewal every ten years to maintain their registration.[15]
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Old 07-14-2012, 01:01 PM   #70 (permalink)
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How much is shipping?
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Quote:
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I see an agglet and I want to paint it black...
...or yellow, orange, green; whatever the field paint is that day.
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