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Old 07-11-2012, 12:32 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Rate These Photos

Let me know what you think and what is good, bad and needs work. I know the fundamentals but sometime working with animals it is hard to do. These were taken with a T1i with a Tamron 28-300 lens.









*I did not do any special setups for these photos, I happened to have my camera with me and got pictures of the dog on our walk*
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmartin View Post
i think you will be fine. Fed Ex was always good to me until my wifes dog bit the driver. they usually don't avoid you unless they have a reason.

Last edited by p8ntninja; 07-11-2012 at 02:17 AM.
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Old 07-11-2012, 01:56 AM   #2 (permalink)
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You have a big problem with focusing. It's either you, the lens, or both. You need to close down the aperture on inexpensive lenses like that to get better sharpness (it probably has a sweet spot of around f8, which means you're going to need a lot of light to take decent photos), especially on the telephoto end. Number 1 lesson: fill the frame. Get closer.
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Old 07-11-2012, 11:37 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Blowing highlights: Reduce your exposure compensation some

Focus: as stated, not right.

Composition: try turning your camera for a vertical (portrait) orientation...then you won't have a vertical rectangle (dog) inside a horizontal rectangle (image).
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Old 07-11-2012, 01:43 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Pic1
Quote:
Exposure Time (1 / Shutter Speed) = 1/640 second ===> 0.00156 second
Lens F-Number / F-Stop = 71/10 ===> ƒ/7.1
Exposure Program = manual control (1)
ISO Speed Ratings = 400
Pic 4
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Exposure Time (1 / Shutter Speed) = 1/640 second ===> 0.00156 second
Lens F-Number / F-Stop = 63/10 ===> ƒ/6.3
Exposure Program = manual control (1)
ISO Speed Ratings = 800
Start with your ISO at 100
for starters

were you using auto focus or manual
cause it looks like you caught the grass infront of the dog
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Old 07-11-2012, 02:26 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Arson24 View Post
Pic1


Pic 4


Start with your ISO at 100
for starters

were you using auto focus or manual
cause it looks like you caught the grass infront of the dog
You have given the most useful info so far. I was manually focusing. ISO was at 800 for the last 2 pics with an f-stop of 6.3 at 1/640.
Top 2 pics were at ISO 400, f-stop of 7.1 at 1/640.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmartin View Post
i think you will be fine. Fed Ex was always good to me until my wifes dog bit the driver. they usually don't avoid you unless they have a reason.
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Old 07-11-2012, 02:48 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Ya always start with your ISO at 100
and adjust the aperture and shutter speed around that
if you need then you can bump the iso up a bit

use the auto focus to your advantage but manual settings to have control
manual focus is great for things that are more static as it gives you a bit more control over what you want the photo to do.
but its hard with the sun and using the view finder to get that focus sometimes.
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:33 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Get eye level with the animal, focus on the eyes as you would in a portrait of a human, make sure the DOF is enough to get the body in focus but sharp enough to not focus the BG. Light stays behind you or to the side to get facial definition. And a good rule of thumb, if the focus isn't perfect to begin with, the entire image is crap.

Btw, I don't shoot anymore but I think I have an eye for it and can give pretty good advice. The most qualified person on this site that I know of is Mike Deep, so don't take my comments for face value, give them a thought and come to your own conclusion. But I hope I helped some.
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:32 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Photo 1:
In general the photo is out of focus. The focus point looks like it landed on the collar but also looks somewhat out of focus.
Front paw is cut off.
The camera should be lower to eye level with the dog.
The rule of thirds are in play, but they don't do anything for this photo. If the dog was off center in one direction and looking at the opposite direction, it would provide additional perspective.
Some post-production work would help to bring out the color and constrast ofthese photos. To reduce post-production, drop your ISO, reduce exposure compensation, use ND filters, or a combination to help recude the harshness of what appears to be midday sunlight.

Photo 2
Pretty much the same as Photo 1. The focus point looks like it landed on the nose.

Photos 3 and 4
Both are clearly out of focus. Set the lens to auto-focus and let the lens/camera do their job.
If you are going to shoot a profile shot, try to get more of the face, especially an eye. If the subject is turned slightly like the dogs in the photos, capture what the subject is looking at. This will provide additional perspective to the shot.

Since you said you shot with manual focus, have you dialed in the diopter to make sure what you see in focus through the camera and what you shoot are the same? The diopter doesn't have an impact on the image itself, but can make for a frustrating time if it's out of adjustment.
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