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Old 07-20-2016, 10:40 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Are you actually straightening the wheel or recentering the hub? If I recall your bike had all campegnelo stuff right? I know the campegnelo dropouts are typically horizontal so they can be adjusted back and forth as opposed to a vertical dropout that only has a single position.

I would buy a new chain, back the hub to the furthest setting towards the back, wrench it down good, and cut the chain to its proper length based on that.

Those particular dropouts are good if you ever want to convert to a hub or fixed gear, but kinda suck for derailers for the exact problem your having. You really gotta tighten the hub nuts down. Double check that your using the right locking hub nuts, or maybe just get new ones so the bite is better.

Are they quick release hubs? If so you might want to replace them with non quick release ones. It's quite possible your fingers are not generating enough torque to clamp that style of hub down.

Get a chain toolkit for cutting your own length rather then buying one already at the right length. You'll probably have to break the old chain and close the new chain to get it off and on anyways.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Bikes are simple. Bike mechanics dont make enough to truly specialize in what they do, most just aren't that knowleadgeable. Of course there are a few rare exceptions that take a vow of poverty because they are obsessed with bikes, but for the most part they're burnouts that graduated from stock boys and bicycle salespeople.

Do the work yourself.

Last edited by theangrydragon; 07-20-2016 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 07-20-2016, 01:55 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Here is some more info and a correction to the OP:
I was not shifting during the climb. I had the gear in place before the climb, but I was climbing very slow with my max power.
The wheel and axel shifted. The gear hub is on the rhs of the wheel, and the front of the wheel shifted to the left. Thus, the back gears are pulled a little closer to the front gears. This shift was so pronounced, the rubber on the tire was rubbing the frame. I tightened the quick release after the first problem, and it happened again on the next hill.

Here are some pictures:




I had confidence in my mechanic because he is a 60 yo bike shop owner, and he was a Bianchi dealer in the 80s. He has been repairing bikes a long time, but he seems a little burned out by customer service and bikes. His attitude has rubbed me the wrong way, but I want to stick with him because I already paid for the labor.
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Old 07-20-2016, 02:42 PM   #13 (permalink)
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did he quote you on a larger chain? because to me it looks like the wheel isnt all the way back into the dropouts.. which on a really high torque push, i could see that being an issue casing it to pull out of alignment
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Old 07-20-2016, 09:37 PM   #14 (permalink)
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did he quote you on a larger chain? because to me it looks like the wheel isnt all the way back into the dropouts.. which on a really high torque push, i could see that being an issue casing it to pull out of alignment
It's definitely not all the way in the dropouts. I think that brass colored screw creates the forward space, and they appear to be turned to the maximum. I think he would install the new chain for the cost of the chain.
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Old 07-20-2016, 09:51 PM   #15 (permalink)
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yeah i see what your talking about, i'm not familiar enough with the old bikes and the campy groupsets i'm used to the today's way of bottoming the axle out in the dropouts.. just looks unusual to me.. im sure theres a reason for it to be like that
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Old 07-20-2016, 10:49 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by jellyghost View Post
It's definitely not all the way in the dropouts. I think that brass colored screw creates the forward space, and they appear to be turned to the maximum. I think he would install the new chain for the cost of the chain.
Yup, those are the horizontal dropouts I was talking about. The screws are all the way in because that's the minimum chain length, which would explain why bad things happen when running on the largest sprockets. It's like someone put too small of a chain on and half assed it by pushing the rear hub as far forward as possible. So the tech is probably right about that.

Based on the oxidation it looks like its been happening for a while and has probably worn away the part of the quick release skewer that acts as a lock washer and digs in to prevent movement. I would replace that as well.

Your chain will stretch a little if it's new, but you should still be able to slam it all the way to the back of the dropouts since the derailer can be adjusted to eat up the slack.

Id recommend getting a chain tool and making your own chain length. Cut it long, adjust it, and if it's still not right you can easily take a link out.

Last edited by theangrydragon; 07-20-2016 at 11:15 PM.
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Old 07-20-2016, 11:46 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theangrydragon View Post
Yup, those are the horizontal dropouts I was talking about. The screws are all the way in because that's the minimum chain length, which would explain why bad things happen when running on the largest sprockets. It's like someone put too small of a chain on and half assed it by pushing the rear hub as far forward as possible. So the tech is probably right about that.

Based on the oxidation it looks like its been happening for a while and has probably worn away the part of the quick release skewer that acts as a lock washer and digs in to prevent movement. I would replace that as well.

Your chain will stretch a little if it's new, but you should still be able to slam it all the way to the back of the dropouts since the derailer can be adjusted to eat up the slack.

Id recommend getting a chain tool and making your own chain length. Cut it long, adjust it, and if it's still not right you can easily take a link out.
I want to take your advice; except for the part about doing the work myself. Should I ask for a new chain, axel at the back of the dropouts, and a new quick release skewer? Would I be able to keep the campi quick release with a new skewer?
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Old 07-21-2016, 12:41 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Nice bike!

My first thought is: Are you doing up the quick-release correctly?

I'm going to assume you aren't just tightening the nut on the drive-side and are actually using the lever to close it.
The rule of thumb is to adjust it so you start feeling the lever offer resistance when it's 90 degrees from closed (so sticking straight out, parallel to the axle). Sometimes you need to fudge on the side of a bit tighter than that, sometimes you need to fudge on the side of so tight you can hardly open or close it (like with a slipping seatpost on a mountain bike).
As with all things bicycle Sheldon Brown is the go-to reference:
Bicycle Quick-Release Mechanisms

If the axle was going to slip in the drop-outs it would be in the small chainring, not the big one as that puts more tension on the chain.

I like to put the rear quick release lever between the seat-stay & chain-stay. That way it's protected from getting knocked open but it's more of a style thing.

7 speed chains are cheap but if the rest of your drivetrain is worn then a new chain will mean new chainrings and cassette.

What happens if you shift to big-big slowly and carefully by hand with the back wheel off the ground?
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Old 07-22-2016, 11:14 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Check out the Sheldon Brown link that surestick posted, that site is like a bible for old bike, I refer to it often. It gives you everything you need to know about skewers.

You can still buy campi skewers but you'd probably be better off going with something less expensive.

Check out Sheldon's site for more info on chains as well.
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Old 07-26-2016, 02:30 AM   #20 (permalink)
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I am really happy with my (new to me) 87 Bianchi bike.
I paid a bike shop to do a "tune-up." They lubricated everything and gave it a cleaning. They also installed a new front brake line, brake pads, and calibrating the gear shifting. When I picked it up, I was warned that the chain was too short. They said the bike couldn't get on the big gear in the front and the big gear in the back at the same time. This also puts the most left/right tension on the chain.
First ride on the tuned bike there was a big problem. While slowly climbing and shifting on a steep hill, the back wheel became cockeyed. The wheel rubber was actually rubbing against the frame. This happened before the tune too, and it was the main reason for the tune. I took the bike back, and the mechanic looked at it and claimed that I must have using the large gear up front and almost the large gear in the back. I don't think that I was.
Anybody know what causes this problem? Is it a small chain problem?
hmm...as for the chain too short, that's no big deal...the big / big combo should not be used anyways. i'm pretty sure the chain on my mtb is "short" as well (along with a short cage rear derailer, which can't take up the slack in the small / small combo. again, not a big deal as that gear set is also never used).

wheel tilted...this depends on the dropouts you have on your frame. i would assume normal "safety" dropouts, which are somewhat vertical and you push your rear wheel all the way back into. your frame and / or dropouts might be bent, so i'd look there. i'd also make sure the rear wheel (and front wheel, while you're at it) are both trued up.

also, doing general bike work yourself is no problem, if you're mechanically inclined. a chain tool is not that expensive. park tools should have a pretty extensive guide on their website as well.
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